Application for Promotion to Full Professor

Application for Promotion to Full Professor

For Office Use Only

 

                                                                        _____________________________________

                                                                        Fiscal Year                 Recommendation No.

 

Section 1

Application for Promotion to Full Professor

 

  1. Name of Candidate: Yanick Rice Lamb
  2. Present Rank: Tenured Associate Professor 3.Proposed Rank: Tenured Full Professor
  3. School or College: Communications 5. Department: Media, Journalism and Film
  4. Date of First Appointment at Howard University: August 2001 as Lecturer
  5. Date of Last Appointment at Howard University: August 2007 as Associate Professor; tenure in August 2012
  6. College or University Faculty Experience:

Associate Professor and Chair

Howard University, Washington, DC

Department of Media, Journalism and Film

August 2015-Present

 

Associate Professor and Interim Assistant Chair

Howard University, Washington, DC

Department of Media, Journalism and Film

August 2013-2015

 

Associate Professor and Print/Online Journalism Sequence Coordinator

Howard University, Washington, DC

Department of Journalism

August 2007-2013

 

Lecturer and Print/Online Journalism Sequence Coordinator

Howard University, Washington, DC

Department of Journalism

August 2001-2007

 

  1. Honors, Awards and Other Distinctions
  • 2018, Social Justice Investigative Journalism Fellowship, Schuster Institute for Investigative Journalism at Brandeis University
  • 2018, Visiting Professor Program, Advertising Educational Foundation (AEF)
  • 2016, Project GRAD, Distinguished Service to Humanity Award, Akron, Ohio
  • 2016, Proclamation from the Ohio House of Representatives
  • 2016, Proclamation from the Mayor of Akron
  • 2015, Serve as founder, adviser and team-teacher of TruthBeTold.news
  • 2016 Best Independent Online Student Publication, Region 2, Society of Professional Journalists Mark of Excellence Awards
  • 2016 National Association of Black Journalists, Salute to Excellence Awards for Collegiate Online Features, “Is D.C. Still the Chocolate City?”
  • 2015, National Association of Black Journalists, Salute to Excellence Award for Digital Features, “Dealing With Dementia”
  • 2015-present, CETLA begins using my digital portfolio as an example of best practices for tenure and promotion: http://www.yanickricelamb.com/howard-portfolio/
  • 2015, Clarion Award, Best Small Website, Association for Women in Communications: http://fierceforblackwomen.com/
  • 2014, Proclamation from the Ohio House of Representatives
  • 2014, Proclamation from the Toledo, Ohio, City Council
  • 2014, Independent Publisher Book Award for BET on Black: African-American Women Celebrate Fatherhood in the Age of Barack Obama, edited by Kenrya Rankin Naasel, Contributed “Daddy, My Brother Barack and Me.” (Memphis: Kifani Press). This book has been praised for shattering stereotypes about black men and black fathers.
  • 2013, Profiled for The History Makers, now based at the Library of Congress
  • 2013, AEJMC Council of Affiliates, Second Annual Industry Research Forum Award for “All the News That Fits on Tablets: An Analysis of News Consumption and Best Practices”
  • 2013, John A. Hartford/MetLife Foundation Journalism in Aging & Health Fellow
  • 2013, John Jay College Center on Media, Crime and Justice Fellow
  • 2013 National Association of Black Journalists, Salute to Excellence finalist, ADHD article
  • 2012 National Association of Black Journalists, Salute to Excellence finalist “Stuck in the Hospital” investigative project on long-term care of the uninsured
  • Serve as adviser of HowardUniversityNewsService.com, which was honored by Society of Professional Journalists Mark of Excellence Awards:
  • 2012 Best Independent Online Student Publication, nationally and for Region 2
  • Reporting, third place, Region 2
  • Serve as adviser of 101 Magazine
  • 2012 Best Profile AEJMC Student Magazine Awards

 

  1. Membership and Offices in Learned or Professional Societies
  • American Society of Magazine Editors, 2013-Present
  • National Magazine Awards, Screening Judge, 2013, 2017 and 2018
  • Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communications, 2013-Present
  • Editorial Board, Journal of New Media and Magazine Research
  • Reviewer for the Magazine Division
  • Division Memberships: Commission on the Status of Minorities, Magazine, Media Management & Economics, Newspaper & Online News
  • Association of Health Care Journalists, mentor and workshop facilitator, 2013-Present
  • Black College Communication Association, 2013-Present
  • Center for Health Media and Policy, National Advisory Council, Hunter College, City University of New York and George Washington University, 2013-Present
  • National Association of Black Journalists, 2013-Present
  • Digital Journalism Task Force, Professors Task Force
  • Salute to Excellence, Judge for newspaper and magazine awards competition, April 2013
  • New York Association of Black Journalists, Lifetime Member, 2013-Present
  • Advisory Board, 2013-Present
  • Online News Association, Educators Task Force, 2013-Present
  • Society of Environmental Journalists, 2013-Present
  • Society of Professional Journalists, 2013-Present
  • Washington Association of Black Journalists, 2013-Present

 

 

  1. Publications

 

(For more information, please see appraisals of the work listed here in Section 12 in accordance with CHSOC Recommendation 305-2015 including Appendix A on Creative Works for the Department of Media, Journalism and Film.)

 

The journalism section on page 7 of Appendix A also notes the following:

While length may be a consideration, it should not be the overriding consideration in evaluating a piece of work. What is more important is the quality of the work and its impact on public debate and to what degree it speaks for the voiceless in underserved communities. A series of short pieces that are timely can make as valuable a contribution as a book, which can take months or years before it reaches the public.

Media Production: Web Development (Peer-Reviewed)

 

  1. Lamb, Y.R., and Crute, S. (2013 to present). Research and development of FierceforBlackWomen.com, an award-winning health and wellness website that fills a void and addresses disparities by targeting African-American women age 35 and older.

 

Media Production: Investigative Series (Peer-Reviewed)

 

  1. Lamb, Y.R. (in preparation). “The Toxin Connection,” accepted for publication in Belt Magazine and the Cleveland Plain Dealer as part of a Social Justice Investigative Journalism Fellowship, Schuster Institute for Investigative Journalism at Brandeis University.

Media Production: In-Depth, Long-Form Article (Peer-Reviewed)

 

  1. Lamb, Y.R. (2014). “Dealing With Dementia.” Principal Investigator of an award-winning, year-long special project examining dementia and caregiving asthe 2013 John A. Hartford/MetLife Foundation Journalism in Aging & Health Fellow. Published jointly on com, the PBS site NextAvenue.orgNew America Media and FierceforBlackWomen.com.

Special Issue of Journal and Overview Article (Peer-Reviewed)

 

  1. Byerly, C., and Lamb, Y.R., eds. (2019). Kerner @ 50: Communication and the Politics of Race in the United States. Special issue of the Howard Journal of Communications. United Kingdom: Taylor & Francis Group.

Overview article (first author):

http://www.yanickricelamb.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/No.-4-Kerner-Overview-Article.pdf

Preliminary online content: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/10646175.2018.1442265

 

Book Chapters (Peer-Reviewed)

 

  1. Lamb, Y.R. (2015). “Communication and Consumer Lifestyle Behavior.” The Routledge Handbook of Magazine Research: The Future of the Magazine Form: Research Perspectives and Prospects. Abrahamson, D. and Prior-Miller, M., eds. New York: Peter Lang Publishing. http://www.routledge.com/books/details/9781138854161/

 

  1. Lamb, Y.R., and Desrosiers, K. (2013). “The Seven Sisters and Their Siblings Go Digital: An Analysis of Women’s Magazine Content on Websites, iPads and Cell Phones.” Social Media: Pedagogy and Practice. Langmia, K., Tyree, T.C.M., O’Brien, P. and Sturgis, I., eds. Lanham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield, Ltd.

Industry Research Award Article (Peer-Reviewed)

 

  1. Lamb, Y.R. (2013). “All the News That Fits on Tablets: An Analysis of News Consumption and Best Practices.” Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (AEJMC) Council of Affiliates, Second Annual Industry Research Forum Award. http://www.aejmc.org/home/2013/08/industry-research-2/

Pending Research

 

  1. Lamb, Y.R. (Under review). “The Impact of Body Mass Index on Women’s Physical Health Ratings, Fibroids, Anemia and Infertility.” Journal of the National Medical Association (Elsevier).

 

  1. Lamb, Y.R. (Under review). “Evelyn Cunningham: The Pittsburgh Courier’s Lynching Editor.” Journalism (Sage Publishing), a journal on theory, practice and criticism.

 

  1. Lamb, Y.R. (2019). “Multiple Sclerosis.” Health and Wellness for People of Color: An Encyclopedia of Issues, Problems and Solutions. Copeland, V.C., ed. Santa Barbara CA: ABC-CLIO/Greenwood. http://www.yanickricelamb.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/No.-10-Multiple-Sclerosis-3000-Word-Article.pdf

Creative Works: Articles

 

  1. Lamb, Y.R. (March 29, 2018). “50 Years After the Kerner Commission, Little Progress for People of Color in Media.” Women’s Media Center. http://www.womensmediacenter.com/news-features/50-years-after-the-kerner-commission-little-progress-for-people-of-color-in-media

 

  1. Lamb, Y.R. (Jan. 31, 2017). ‘“I Am Not Your Negro’ Shows James Baldwin as a ‘Witness’ Then and Now.’” USA Today newspaper and USA TODAY’s Black History Month Special Edition:History Comes Home. https://www.usatoday.com/story/life/nation-now/2017/01/31/baldwin-witness-now/97285092/

 

  1. Lamb, Y.R. (Feb. 18, 2017.) “Remembering Gwen Ifill.” USA Today newspaper and USA TODAY’s Black History Month Special Edition:History Comes Home. https://www.usatoday.com/story/money/business/2017/02/18/black-history-month-remembering-gwen-ifill/97422124/

 

  1. Lamb, Y.R. (Oct. 28, 2016). “African-American History Museum Does Justice to Women.” Women’s Media Center. http://www.womensmediacenter.com/feature/entry/museum-of-african-american-history

 

  1. Lamb, Y.R. (June 20, 2016). “Hanging at LeBron’s High School: A Sweet Night for the Akron Faithful.” ESPN/The Undefeated. http://theundefeated.com/features/hanging-at-lebrons-high-school/,

 

  1. Lamb, Y.R. (June 10, 2014). “Shari Headley Stars at Home and in the Community.” Fierce online magazine. http://fierceforblackwomen.com/2014/06/10/shari-headley-stars-at-home-and-in-the-community/,

 

  1. Lamb, Y.R. (March 13, 2014). “Sweetie Pie’s Recipe for Business.” Fierce online magazine. http://fierceforblackwomen.com/2014/03/13/sweetie-pies-recipe-for-business/,

 

  1. Lamb, Y.R. (March/April 2013). “In Death, New Life: The Discovery of Unknown Graves at the University of Virginia Reveals the Institution’s Brush With Slavery.” The History Channel Magazine.

 

Creative Works: Invited Book Chapters and Essays

 

  1. Lamb, Y.R. (2013). “Daddy, My Brother Barack and Me.” BET on Black: African-American Women Celebrate Fatherhood in the Age of Barack Obama. Naasel, K.R., ed. (Memphis: Kifani Press).

 

  1. Lamb, Y.R. (October 2012).Obamacare and the Wizards of Bad Behavior” and “The Art of the Diss.” Haternation: How Racism & Incivility Are Dividing Us. Foote, N., ed. University of North Texas.

Creative Works: Article Collections

“A collection of short reported pieces about a single subject or a substantive collection on diverse subjects.” (Recommendation 305-2015 Appendix A). Please see appraisals in Section 12.

 

  1. Lamb, Y.R. Research and Reporting on the Affordable Care Act
  2. Lamb, Y.R. Research and Reporting on Women’s Issues
  3. Lamb, Y.R. Research and Reporting on Health and Fitness
  4. Lamb, Y.R. Research and Reporting on Social Issues and Politics
  5. Lamb, Y.R. Research and Reporting on Lifestyles and Popular Culture

Creative Works: Special Projects

“Development and management of meritorious special projects of an academic or professional nature that exceed normal expectations of teaching and/or instruction and supervision of co-curricular programs.” (Recommendation 305-2015 Appendix A). Please see appraisals in Section 12.

 

  1. news, the nation’s first and only collegiate fact-checking site

 

  1. Howard University News Service (HUNewsService.com and HowardUniversityElectionProject.com)

 

  1. 101 Magazine and 101Magazine.net

 

 

 

 

  1. Appraisal of Publications (Complete for each publication)

 

 

CANDIDATE’S STATEMENT

Publication No. 1

 

Media Production: Web Development

 

Title: FierceforBlackWomen.com

 

Co-Principal Investigator and Co-founder: Lamb, Yanick Rice

 

Contribution

I’ve been involved in research and development of a digital network that addresses health disparities by targeting African-American women age 35 and older. The core of the network is a health and wellness website, FierceforBlackWomen.com, which is supplemented by face-to-face interaction, social media and eventually customized apps. Fierce also puts us at the forefront of digital media entrepreneurship at a time when African Americans are woefully under-represented and overlooked.

 

Synopsis

When it comes to health and many other areas, women are the decision makers and influencers. Healthy women mean healthy families and healthy communities. Fierce is an exciting, digital network that fills a void in the media landscape by helping busy, dynamic black women in the prime of their lives be healthy, fit and fabulous. Fierce helps women and their families break the cycle of health disparities, which is literally a matter of life or death in many cases.

 

Impact/Recognition

FierceforBlackWomen.com is revolutionary because women’s magazines and websites tend to focus disproportionately on beauty, fashion and entertainment. In this youth-obsessed world, they are also lacking in content and images featuring black women who are 35 and older. My co-founder and I bring years of trust and experience in health journalism from publications ranging from Essence and Heart & Soul to Health and Scientific American. For years, women have been begging us to develop the equivalent of a “black More magazine.” (More focused primarily on white women over 40.)

 

No other media outlets offer the in-depth, journalistic analysis on health and well-being that Fierce provides, along with consistent access to leading health experts, such as those on the advisory board. For example, Fierce published an in-depth series on fibroids — a woefully under-covered topic that greatly affects African American women. If and when other news outlets report on fibroids, it’s just one article that skims the surface. This series also launched “Living Well: Fierce Reports on Black Women’s Health.” We are also partnering with a non-profit to increase the number of in-depth reports and to train journalists in covering black women’s health. The goal of the partnership is to raise the representation and expertise of African Americans in health journalism, broadening coverage of health disparities, and offsetting myths and stereotypes.

 

In November 2013, we began conducting an open beta test of Fierce to gauge response and determine the best way to develop the network. The site has been gaining traction and has been well received by women and the health community.

 

As a major production, my research and development of FierceforBlackWomen.com meets criteria No. 6, 7, 8 and 9 set forth on pages 9 and 10 in Appendix A of Recommendation 305-2015 as an Exemplary Creative/Professional Activity:

 

Criteria No. 6. Editing/producing a website that is nationally or internationally recognized and that is updated at least weekly for a minimum of nine consecutive months.

  • Fierce has been updated at least weekly for most of the last five years, particularly the 24 consecutive months from 2013 to 2015 during the open beta testing period

Criteria No. 7. A level of excellence that exceeds professional norms that enhances professional discipline and that is nationally or internationally recognized.

  • Fierce has been praised by such organizations as the National Black Women’s Health Imperative and has collaborated with the American Heart Association.
  • It has won awards and peer review from the Association of Women in Communications and the National Association of Black Journalists.
  • Fierce was a finalist for grants from the International Media Women Foundation; Pipeline Angels; and the NewU program sponsored by the Ford Foundation and Unity Journalists for Diversity.

Criteria No. 8. Development or application of technology for communication enterprises or for the educational community, including new and existing websites; regularly maintained and nationally recognized web logs (blogs) and video logs (vlogs).

  • Successful application of Word Press technology, including Divi modules, along with open-source and social media tools
  • Developing customized apps to serve African-American families, employing health informatics

Criteria No. 9. Strategic media/business plan that has achieved industry-standard measures for best practices.

  • Initial indicators:
    • 10,000 unique web visitors; currently more than 100,000 (Source: Alexa Internet)
    • 4 million Facebook and Twitter impressions
    • 945k Outbrain impressions
  • Praised for successfully establishing a niche audience and engaging readers
    • Fierce outperforms leading health sites in engaging readers. This includes Essence, Fitness, Shape, Self and Women’s Health, according to Alexa Internet Inc.
      • Page views per visit: 3.6 pages for Fierce readers vs. 1.59 to 2.22 for national competitors Essence, Fitness, Shape, Self and Women’s Health
      • Daily time on site: 4.3 minutes for Fierce readers vs. 2.17 to 2.53 for the national competitors, above
    • “Congratulations! You’ve created a wonderful site!”
    • “Engaging, inspiring, necessary.”
    • “This is excellent and has been missing from the market for us!”
    • “Beautiful!”
    • “This new venture is so exciting — and welcomed! I look forward to watching it grow and prosper.”
  • What Fierce women are saying:

 

 

 

CANDIDATE’S STATEMENT

Publication No. 2

 

Media Production: Investigative Series

 

Title: “The Toxin Connection”

 

Principal Investigator: Lamb, Yanick Rice

 

Synopsis

“The Toxin Connection” is an interactive series examining occupational and environmental health in an industrial community as part of a Social Justice Investigative Journalism Fellowship. The focus is on the generational impact of toxins that have resulted in elevated levels of cancer and auto-immune diseases. Multimedia will include photos, video, data visualization and mapping. I have been conducting in-depth interviews with patients, physicians, researchers, environmentalists and politicians as well as health, public policy, industry and public officials who essentially gave corporations a pass by maintaining low regulatory standards.

 

Impact/Recognition

This is an under-reported environmental and medical story. The goal of “The Toxin Connection” is to provide public service journalism by answering questions long on the minds of local residents who have endured decades of silence and indifference like in Flint, Michigan. My investigation would sort through myths and facts; dig into the data and other research to highlight why disease rates are so high; discuss genomics; and delve into allegations of political inaction, and corporate influence or suppression of possible health risks. I would examine health care over the years, environmental monitoring historically, and the status and impact of legislation, including the Toxic Substances Control Act.

 

My project has been accepted for publication in Belt Magazine and the Cleveland Plain Dealer. It is sponsored by the Schuster Institute for Investigative Journalism at Brandeis University and the Fund for Investigative Journalism, which includes representatives providing peer review from leading news organizations such as the Chicago Tribune, Wall Street Journal, Reuters, the Washington Post and the NAACP’s Crisis Magazine. Pro bono support and peer review is also being provided by the Reporters Committee for Freedom of the Press, a data journalist at Kaiser Health News and a correspondent at the New York Times. The fellowship includes a $8,800 grant.

 

As a major production, my research and development of “The Toxin Connection” meets criteria No. 1 and 10 set forth on pages 9 and 10 in Appendix A of Recommendation 305-2015 as an Exemplary Creative/Professional Activity:

 

Criteria No. 1. Acquisition of a major regional, national or international grant.

Criteria No. 10. Authorship of works such as articles, reviews, commentaries, multimedia, and/or other creative projects published or broadcast locally, nationally or internationally in newspapers, magazines, popular or industry-specific media (e.g., PR Tactics, JAE, Folio, AJR, CJR etc.) or on the Internet if they demonstrate high standards in the practice of the discipline. This can include:

  • A singular in-depth or long-form article, special report or other project.

For more information on this confidential, investigative series, please click on the link below and enter the password, which is case sensitive.

 

Password: Lamb2018

 

http://www.yanickricelamb.com/project/the-toxin-connection/

 

 

 

CANDIDATE’S STATEMENT

Publication No. 3

 

Major Production: In-Depth, Long-Form Article

 

Title: “Dealing With Dementia”

 

Principal Investigator: Lamb, Yanick Rice

 

Synopsis

As the 2013 John A. Hartford/MetLife Foundation Journalism in Aging & Health Fellow, I spent a year researching Alzheimer’s disease, other forms of dementia and caregiving.

Changes in the brain can cause dementia, severely impairing mental abilities including memory, movement, reasoning and thoughts. African-American women and men are two to three times more likely to develop dementia than white Americans. Additionally, given health disparities and chronic conditions disproportionately affecting African Americans, dementia can interfere with management of diseases such as diabetes.

 

After extensively interviewing several people with dementia, caregivers and medical experts, I found the perfect family to profile right here in Washington — a single man caring for his 83-year-old mother. He was also a rarity. Only a third of caregivers are men, according to a study by the National Alliance for Caregiving and AARP. Men are less likely to be the main or only person in this role. They’re less likely to be involved with personal care and more likely to pay for it. In addition to presenting a different face of caregiving, this family helped to illustrated the commonalities that affect everyone as well as the unique attributes of African Americans, who are 65% more likely to be primary caregivers than other groups.

 

Impact/Recognition

New America Media (NAM), a coalition of 3,000 ethnic news organizations, provided oversight, peer review and editing of this year-long project in collaboration with the Gerontological Society of America. I also attended GSA’s annual scientific meeting and NAM seminars, building upon my previous research at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) as an Alzhiemer’ s Disease Fellow through the National Press Foundation. TheRoot.com, the PBS site NextAvenue.org and New America Media published the article as well as FierceforBlackWomen.com, which ran a longer version.

 

Within 48 hours, the article on TheRoot.com attracted 4,958 likes on Facebook, 1,244 shares and 344 comments. “Dealing With Dementia” won a Salute to Excellence Award from the National Association of Black Journalists. The Hartford Foundation also used the article to inspire family caregivers and health providers to share stories for Better Caregiving, Better Lives: Real Life Strategies and Solutions. Various organizations invited me to speak about the article, including AARP and the Association of Health Care Journalists. I continue to research and work on projects related to dementia and caregiving as well as the intersection of the two.

 

Dealing With Dementia: Impact at a Glance:

 

My special report on dementia meets criteria No. 1 and 10 set forth on pages 9 and 10 in Appendix A of Recommendation 305-2015 as an Exemplary Creative/Professional Activity:

 

Criteria No. 1. Acquisition of a major regional, national or international grant.

Criteria No. 10. Authorship of works such as articles, reviews, commentaries, multimedia, and/or other creative projects published or broadcast locally, nationally or internationally in newspapers, magazines, popular or industry-specific media (e.g., PR Tactics, JAE, Folio, AJR, CJR etc.) or on the Internet if they demonstrate high standards in the practice of the discipline. This can include:

  • A singular in-depth or long-form article, special report or other project.

 

 

CANDIDATE’S STATEMENT

Publication No. 4

Special Issue of Journal and Overview Article

 

Byerly, C., and Lamb, Y.R., eds. (in preparation). Kerner @ 50: Communication and the Politics of Race in the United States. Special issue of the Howard Journal of Communications. United Kingdom: Taylor & Francis Group.

 

Online content: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/10646175.2018.1442265

 

Role: Serving as co-editor in conceiving, developing and editing special issue of journal and as first author on the overview article.

 

Synopsis and Impact:

In 1968, following a series of violent urban rebellions, the National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders released its “Kerner Report” concluding that the United States was “moving toward two societies, one black, one white – separate and unequal.”

 

The “Kerner Commission,” nicknamed for its chairman Governor Otto Kerner of Illinois, laid part of the blame for these rebellions at the feet of the news media for their imbalanced coverage and hiring practices. As a result, the report said, an almost entirely white core of reporters and editors in the nation’s media had failed to report adequately on race relations, particularly omitting the difficulties experienced by those in inner cities.

 

Successive generations of news leaders have tried and failed to reach goals of parity in making mainstream newsrooms reflect the country’s demographics. Some studies show that neither have those media yet been able to adequately cover race matters in a nation experiencing an ongoing “browning of America” and the emergence of a new era of race-related civil unrest and violence.

 

Scholars and media practitioners have submitted both commentaries and scholarly manuscripts on “Kerner @ 50: Communication and the Politics of Race in the United States.” Two department chairs in the Cathy Hughes School of Communications proposed this special issue of the Howard Journal of Communications to assess the state of affairs over the half-century since the release of the landmark report. Their overview article focuses on media reaction to the report as well as the stance of President Lyndon B. Johnson on the riots and on the findings of the commission he had assembled.

 

This project meets criteria No. 3 set forth on pages 9 in Appendix A of Recommendation 305-2015 as an Exemplary Creative/Professional Activity:

 

Criteria No. 3. Writing, editing and/or production of a scholarly, professional or popular book, monograph or other material if the project demonstrates high standards in the practice of the discipline and/or is published by a major publisher or academic press.

 

 

 

CANDIDATE’S STATEMENT

Publication No. 5

Book Chapter (Peer-Reviewed)

 

Lamb, Y.R. (2015). “Communication and Consumer Lifestyle Behavior.” The Routledge Handbook of Magazine Research: The Future of the Magazine Form: Research Perspectives and Prospects. Abrahamson, D. and Prior-Miller, M., eds. New York: Peter Lang Publishing. http://www.routledge.com/books/details/9781138854161/

 

Role

I wrote one of 31 peer-reviewed chapters, examining scholarly research on magazines that subscribe to a consumerist philosophy and that are marketed to the general public. Click here to read the manuscript.

 

Application of Theory

This chapter examines consumer magazines through a research review and historical analysis. It explores research focusing on the interplay between magazines and consumer lifestyles — how magazines covered and often influenced consumer lifestyles as well as how consumer lifestyles influenced the content in magazines. A common thread in the literature is how readers increasingly came to be viewed and valued as consumers, particularly as potential buyers of the products and services advertised in magazines. In the process, magazines stimulated consumptive behavior by playing to the needs and wants of consumers. These consumer magazines help to create and feed reader appetites for esteem and enjoyment — whether readers aspired to the lifestyles featured in the publications and whether they could afford to obtain or maintain them.


Publisher’s Description

Scholarly engagement with the magazine form has, in the last two decades, produced a substantial amount of valuable research. Authored by leading academic authorities in the study of magazines, the chapters in The Routledge Handbook of Magazine Research not only create an architecture to organize and archive the developing field of magazine research, but also suggest new avenues of future investigation. Each of 33 chapters surveys the last 20 years of scholarship in its subject area, identifying the major research themes, theoretical developments and interpretive breakthroughs. Exploration of the digital challenges and opportunities which currently face the magazine world are woven throughout, offering readers a deeper understanding of the magazine form, as well as of the sociocultural realities it both mirrors and influences.

The book includes six sections:

-Methodologies and structures presents theories and models for magazine research in an evolving, global context.

-Magazine publishing: the people and the work introduces the roles and practices of those involved in the editorial and business sides of magazine publishing.

-Magazines as textual communication surveys the field of contemporary magazines across a range of theoretical perspectives, subjects, genre and format questions.

-Magazines as visual communication explores cover design, photography, illustrations and interactivity.

-Pedagogical and curricular perspectives offers insights on undergraduate and graduate teaching topics in magazine research.

-The future of the magazine form speculates on the changing nature of magazine research via its environmental effects, audience, and transforming platforms.

 

 

 

CANDIDATE’S STATEMENT

Publication No. 6

Book Chapter (Peer-Reviewed)

 

Lamb, Y.R., and Desrosiers, K. (2013). “The Seven Sisters and Their Siblings Go Digital: An Analysis of Women’s Magazine Content on Websites, iPads and Cell Phones.” Social Media: Pedagogy and Practice. Langmia, K., Tyree, T.C.M., O’Brien, P. and Sturgis, I., eds. Lanham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield, Ltd.

 

Role

I co-authored one of 13 peer-reviewed chapters, edited by Dr. Kehbuma Langmia and Dr. Tia C.M. Tyree, associate professors in the Department of Strategic, Legal and Management Communications at Howard University; Pamela C. O’Brien, associate professor and chair of the Department of Communications at Bowie State University; and Ingrid Sturgis, associate professor of new media in the Department of Media, Journalism and Film at Howard University. According to the editors, “Social Media: Pedagogy and Practice examines how interactive technologies can be applied to teaching, research and the practice of communication. This book demonstrates how social media can be utilized in the classroom to build the skill sets of students going into journalism, public relations, integrated marketing, and other communications fields.”

 

Abstract

For more than a century, a group of women’s magazines known as the Seven Sisters have been leaders in their category. Since the onset of the women’s movement, their relevance has been questioned and one of the sisters has died. This research will seek to determine if the magazines are effectively using websites, cell phones and tablets based on a multi-platform analysis of content as well as mobile, app and website usability frameworks.

 

Impact/Recognition

For more than a century, the “Seven Sisters” have dominated the women’s magazines category (Johnson and Prijatel, 2007). They have also been leaders in magazine publishing overall, with some titles ranking in the top 10 for circulation and advertising revenue. The eldest sister, McCall’s, was born as The Queen: Illustrating McCall’s Bazaar Glove-Fitting Patterns in 1870 (Endres and Luech, 1995). Her siblings appeared from the1880s to 1930s: Ladies Home Journal, Good Housekeeping, Redbook, Better Homes and Gardens, Woman’s Day, and finally Family Circle.

 

Over the years, the magazines have undergone periodic makeovers, as feminists and others questioned their relevance and historical focus on homemaking especially during the women’s movement of the 1960s and 1970s. One of the most severe makeovers led to the death of McCall’s, which morphed into Rosie the Magazine in 2001 to compete with upscale women’s magazines such as O the Oprah Magazine and Martha Stewart Living. In November 2000, comedian and talk-show host Rosie O’Donnell signed an agreement with Gruner & Jahr to be a partner in what was originally conceived as Rosie’s McCall’s (Kuczynski, 2001). By the end of 2002, Rosie had ceased publication amid a flurry of counter-suits (McCafferty, 2003).

 

In light of one of the most radical eras of media transition, this study will analyze whether the survivors are keeping up with technological advances to serve readers and remain competitive with younger women’s magazines. It will seek to determine if the magazines are effectively using websites, cell phones, and tablets — the primary tools at the center of this digital transformation. This research coincided with the well-received debut of the iPad and the rush to be early adopters and innovators. Effective use of such tools can impact a media company’s success, and the success of the major publications examined in this study has industry-wide implications.

 

Application of Theory

This study incorporated Dr. Jakob Nielsen’s widely cited usability research as a theoretical framework to analyze 10 magazines along with their websites, mobile sites, and any iPad apps to address the following research questions:

  • RQ1: Are the Seven Sisters keeping up with technological advances to serve readers and remain competitive with other women’s magazines?
  • RQ2: Are the magazines using technology effectively?

 

Editorial Reviews

“This book is an impressive blend of theoretical overview, case studies, and practical application of social media content and platforms. It makes a compelling case for social media literacy, exploring its social and civic uses while arguing for the need to understand and harness the potential of social networks.” (Beth Dobkin, provost and vice president for academic affairs, St. Mary’s College, California)

 

Social Media: Pedagogy and Practice decidedly cuts straight to the core of digital consumption practices in the context of the world’s most prominent universal mode of open discourse — social media — by laying bare the glaring technical opportunities, inescapable teleological challenges, ambiguous participatory utilities, and persistently political and economic anxieties associated with representing civic identities.” (Ronald L. Jackson II, Editor of Critical Studies in Media Communication and author of Scripting the Black Masculine Body in Popular Media)

 

 

 

CANDIDATE’S STATEMENT

Publication No. 7

Industry Research Award Article (Peer-Reviewed)

 

Lamb, Y.R. (2013). “All the News That Fits on Tablets: An Analysis of News Consumption and Best Practices.” Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (AEJMC) Council of Affiliates, Second Annual Industry Research Forum Award.  http://www.aejmc.org/home/2013/08/industry-research-2/

 

Recognition

AEJMC Council of Affiliates Second Annual Industry Research Award 

AEJMC Synopsis

The AEJMC Council of Affiliates Annual Industry Research Forum competition began with AEJMC’s Centennial conference in August in Chicago. The interdependence between the academy and the professional and industry organizations it serves provides an opportunity for collaboration on research that can benefit everyone.

The Council of Affiliates of AEJMC, which consists of 35 member organizations related to the fields of journalism and mass communication, sponsors an annual Industry Research Forum designed to strengthen the academy/industry link.

The 2013 winners each presented their research at the AEJMC Conference in Washington, DC. The winners are as follows, and their research can be found here:

  • “All the News That Fits on Tablets: An Analysis of News Consumption and Best Practices,” Yanick Rice Lamb, Howard University
  • “Social Media And Journalism: What Works Best And Why It Matters,” Sue Burzynski Bullard, University of Nebraska-Lincoln

 

Abstract

In light of the biggest media revolution since the debut of radio and television, this paper seeks to analyze whether newspapers and magazines are effectively using iPads and other tablets to serve readers and remain competitive. This will include examining whether news organizations are making the most of the technology, explaining the production and financial challenges, determining best practices, looking at the future and assessing what attracts and keeps readers.

 

 

 

CANDIDATE’S STATEMENT

Publication No. 8

Pending Research

Refereed Journal Article (Under Review)

 

Lamb, Y.R. (Under review). “The Impact of Body Mass Index on Women’s Physical Health Ratings, Fibroids, Anemia and Infertility.” Journal of the National Medical Association (Elsevier).

 

Abstract

Obesity is considered a global epidemic that will be the leading cause of death by 2020, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). This research supports the regression-related central organizing hypothesis that the Body Mass Index is explainable by physical health ratings for women across racial and ethnic groups and their self-reports of diagnosed fibroids, anemia and infertility. Multiple regression and percent distribution were used to address the COH by analyzing data from the Collaborative Psychiatric Epidemiology Surveys (CPES) as part of the National Survey of American Life (NSAL), 2001-2003. Based on the differential effects theory, this research helps to fill a void in the literature on reproductive health through the lens of obesity as it relates to race, ethnicity and gender. It may also have clinical and public health implications, such as enhancing awareness and wellness outcomes among black women who suffer disproportionately from obesity, infertility, fibroids and anemia, which is a risk factor for pregnancy complications and low birthweight.

 

Impact

The intersection of reproductive health and obesity are rarely discussed as they relate to black women, who are already disproportionately affected by health disparities. African-American women are at the center of the global obesity epidemic that WHO predicts will be the leading cause of death by 2020. About four out of five African-American women are overweight or obese — the highest rate of any group in the United States (Office of Minority Health 2016). At this critical juncture in health care, this research will shed light on the impact of obesity on fibroids, infertility and anemia.

 

“Uterine fibroids are the most common benign tumors in women of childbearing age,” according to NIH: National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (2017). “Fibroids are made of muscle cells and other tissues that grow in and around the wall of the uterus, or womb. The cause of fibroids is unknown. Risk factors include being African American or being overweight.” Black women are three time more likely than white women to have fibroids (Brigham and Young Hospital 2017). The risk is two to three times higher for heavy women (Office of Women’s Health reports 2017). Fibroids are also more prevalent as women reach the 30s and 40s, which includes the median age (44) of the population for this research paper (Brigham 2017).

 

Infertility is also a rarely discussed issue among African Americans. However, black women are infertile as much as or more than white women, said Rosario Ceballo, who published a 2016 paper in the Psychology of Women Quarterly titled “Silent and Infertile: An Intersectional Analysis of the Experiences of Socioeconomically Diverse African American Women With Infertility.”

 

Anemia disproportionately affects women. It can lead to fatigue, which impairs a woman’s ability or willingness to exercise, possibly leading to weight gain and placing her at risk for chronic health conditions. “The prevalence of iron deficiency anemia is 2 percent in adult men, 9 to 12 percent in non-Hispanic white women, and nearly 20 percent in black and Mexican-American women” (Killip, Bennett and Chambers 2007). Anemia can be especially problematic during pregnancy when blood needs increase by a third. Severe anemia increases the risk of pre-term delivery, blood loss during labor, low-birthweight babies and infection (American Society of Hematology 2017). Black women are three times more likely than white women to have low birthweight babies of 5.5. pounds or less (Black Women’s Health Imperative 2017).

 

 

 

CANDIDATE’S STATEMENT

Publication No. 9

Pending Research

Refereed Journal Article (Under Review)

 

Lamb, Y.R. (Under review). “Evelyn Cunningham: The Pittsburgh Courier’s Lynching Editor.” Journalism (Sage Publishing), a journal on theory, practice and criticism.

 

Abstract

From 1943 to 1962, Evelyn Cunningham was a reporter and columnist for the Pittsburgh Courier, a leading black newspaper. She also spent five years as a radio host, interviewing newsmakers ranging from Malcolm X to Sammy Davis Jr. Known as the “lynching editor,” Cunningham was among the few women who covered the hot spots of the Civil Rights Movement. She chronicled an important chapter in U.S. history, not only as a correspondent for the black press but also as a stringer for New York dailies. However, little is known about Cunningham’s role as a journalist and witness to history.

Application of Theory

This historical research attempts to fill a void in the literature on Evelyn Cunningham, using black feminist thought as critical social theory. It incorporates in-depth interviews with the journalist, her contemporaries, observers and experts on various topics, such as the black press. It also incorporates secondary research and an examination of Cunningham’s articles at the Pittsburgh Courier as part of the holdings of the Moorland-Spingarn Research Center at Howard University and the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture in New York City. Some of Cunningham’s articles were digitized as part of the ProQuest Historical Newspapers (Pittsburgh Courier: 1911-2002).

 

 

 

CANDIDATE’S STATEMENT

Publication No. 10

Pending Research

Encyclopedia Entry (Accepted for Publication)

 

 

Lamb, Y.R. (in preparation). “Multiple Sclerosis.” Health and Wellness for People of Color: An Encyclopedia of Issues, Problems and Solutions. Copeland, V.C., ed. Santa Barbara CA: ABC-CLIO/Greenwood.

 

Synopsis

My 3,000-word article on multiple sclerosis will be part of a two-volume work to be published in 2019. It will help to dispel myths that MS doesn’t affect African Americans.  In fact, the risk is 47 percent higher and three times higher for black women than for black men, according to a 2013 study in Neurology. MS can also strike harder — with more complications, relapses and disability. For example, a 2004 study in Neurology indicates that African Americans require wheelchairs eight years sooner.

 

Impact: Summary of the Work From the Editor

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Minority Health found that people of color face significant health disparities, both in disease and illness and in access to health care. This comprehensive reference work explores health issues and racial and ethnic minorities and will include everything from health insurance and access to medical care to a wide range of health issues.

 

Entries will provide broad information on health topics as well as specific information as it relates to youth and adults within racial and ethnic minority groups – African American, American Indians, Asian Americans, and Latinos. A-Z entries and sidebars provide up-to-date information and include statistics, data, and other resources.

 

  • Valire Carr Copeland, Ph.D., MPH

 

 

 

CANDIDATE’S STATEMENT

Publication No. 11

Creative Work/Article

 

Lamb, Y.R. (March 29, 2018). “50 Years After the Kerner Commission, Little Progress for People of Color in Media.” Women’s Media Center. http://www.womensmediacenter.com/news-features/50-years-after-the-kerner-commission-little-progress-for-people-of-color-in-media

 

Synopsis

Fifty years ago, the Kerner Commission blamed media portrayals, or lack thereof, for contributing to nationwide uprisings in the summer of 1967 by African Americans who were sick and tired of being sick and tired, to paraphrase Fannie Lou Hamer. The National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders, as it was officially called, appointed by President Lyndon Johnson to investigate the underlying causes of the unrest, made some sobering findings, concluding, “Our nation is moving toward two societies, one black, one white — separate and unequal.”

It also found that the media presented a fragmented picture to the public that failed to show the everyday lives of black and brown people and that underplayed disparities in areas such as education, housing, employment, income, health, and policing.

To mark the 50th anniversary of the report, commemorative conferences, studies, and other research have assessed progress in the last half-century. The picture is decidedly mixed, with African-American unemployment, for example, consistently remaining about double the rate for whites, the Economic Policy Institute found. More people of color work in some segments of media, but nothing near fair representation. Coverage is more diverse, but stereotypes and distortions persist.

Impact

This article was circulated widely on social media with references to many of the points for the need for more diversity in journalism to reduce stereotypes and misleading coverage.

Black journalists’ expertise and sensibilities are essential to providing a fair and balanced view of the world, especially communities of color, from Harlem to Haiti, where my family is from. Whether local or international, too many of our communities are covered based on what I call the three Cs — coups, crisis, or crime.

After the Kerner Commission chastised the media for this kind of bias, news leaders set a goal to make newsrooms reflect the country’s demographics by the year 2000. The media missed the mark.

Fair and balanced news coverage is critical, because it influences leaders who make decisions about all of us — from teachers, coaches, loan officers, and doctors to cops, judges, legislators, and presidents.

The media, including student journalists at Howard University, should heed the Kerner Commission’s call to action and the prescience of its words on unity. “Prejudice has shaped our history decisively; it now threatens to affect our future,” the commission said. “There can be no higher priority for national action and no higher claim on the nation’s conscience.”

This publication meets criteria No. 10 set forth on page 10 in Appendix A of Recommendation 305-2015 as an Exemplary Creative/Professional Activity.

Criteria No. 10. Authorship of works such as articles, reviews, commentaries, multimedia, and/or other creative projects published or broadcast locally, nationally or internationally in newspapers, magazines, popular or industry-specific media (e.g., PR Tactics, JAE, Folio, AJR, CJR etc.) or on the Internet if they demonstrate high standards in the practice of the discipline.

 

 

 

CANDIDATE’S STATEMENT

Publication No. 12

Creative Work/Article

 

Lamb, Y.R. (Jan. 31, 2017). ‘“I Am Not Your Negro’ Shows James Baldwin as a ‘Witness’ Then and Now.’” USA Today newspaper and USA TODAY’s Black History Month Special Edition: History Comes Home. https://www.usatoday.com/story/life/nation-now/2017/01/31/baldwin-witness-now/97285092/

 

Synopsis

USA Today invited me to write two articles for a Black History Month Special Edition circulated internationally: http://onlinestore.usatoday.com/black-history-month-2017-p18570.aspx

 

The articles also ran in the regular newspaper. This one dealt with how Haitian filmmaker Raoul Peck captured the timeless wisdom and creativity of acclaimed author and activist James Baldwin in the book and film, I Am Not Your Negro.

 

Impact

I Am Not Your Negro was nominated for an Academy Award as the 2016 Best Documentary Feature and won several awards at film festivals internationally. It is based in part on 30 pages that Baldwin’s sister, Gloria Karefa-Smart, handed to Peck from an unfinished Baldwin manuscript called Remember This House. Baldwin had planned to examine the lives of his friends Medgar Evers, Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr., civil rights figures all assassinated within a five-year span from 1963 to 1968.

 

Some say Baldwin was prescient in dissecting the “Negro problem in America” and making it relevant for today. But Peck says it was more that Baldwin was well-read, had a sharp mind and got straight to the point with his own timeless messages. “He goes to the fundamentals and fundamentals are always true,” Peck said.

 

USA Today has average daily paid circulation Monday to Friday of 726,906 with a print readership of 2.6 million and 97.4 million unique visitors on its website.

 

This publication meets criteria No. 10 set forth on page 10 in Appendix A of Recommendation 305-2015 as an Exemplary Creative/Professional Activity:

 

Criteria No. 10. Authorship of works such as articles, reviews, commentaries, multimedia, and/or other creative projects published or broadcast locally, nationally or internationally in newspapers, magazines, popular or industry-specific media (e.g., PR Tactics, JAE, Folio, AJR, CJR etc.) or on the Internet if they demonstrate high standards in the practice of the discipline.

 

 

 

CANDIDATE’S STATEMENT

Publication No. 13

Creative Work/Article

 

 

Lamb, Y.R. (Feb. 18, 2017.) “Remembering Gwen Ifill.” USA Today newspaper and USA TODAY’s Black History Month Special Edition: History Comes Home. https://www.usatoday.com/story/money/business/2017/02/18/black-history-month-remembering-gwen-ifill/97422124/

 

Synopsis

USA Today invited me to write two articles for a Black History Month Special Edition circulated internationally: http://onlinestore.usatoday.com/black-history-month-2017-p18570.aspx

 

The articles also ran in the regular newspaper. The editor was attracted to a previous piece that I wrote about the life and death of journalist Gwen Ifill for the Women’s Media Center.

 

Impact

Fame never changed Gwen Ifill. “She was ‘regular’ in the best sense of the word,” recalls Kevin Merida, who met her as a college student and later became friends and friendly competitors. She made a smooth transition from print to broadcast journalism, becoming moderator and managing editor of PBS’s Washington Week as well as co-anchor and managing editor of PBS NewsHour — the last positions she held before her death Nov. 14 of cancer at age 61. Her death resonated with everyone from the Obamas to ordinary citizens of all backgrounds.

 

Ifill just did her job and did it well — so well that guests gravitated toward Washington Week for its no-nonsense quality. Journalists emulated her, and viewers tuned in night after night. ABC reporter Candace Smith likens Ifill’s impact to that of the first African-American woman to go into space. “She was the Mae Jemison of journalism, our own trailblazer, our pioneer.”

 

USA Today has average daily paid circulation Monday to Friday of 726,906 with a print readership of 2.6 million and 97.4 million unique visitors on its website.

 

This publication meets criteria No. 10 set forth on page 10 in Appendix A of Recommendation 305-2015 as an Exemplary Creative/Professional Activity.

 

Criteria No. 10. Authorship of works such as articles, reviews, commentaries, multimedia, and/or other creative projects published or broadcast locally, nationally or internationally in newspapers, magazines, popular or industry-specific media (e.g., PR Tactics, JAE, Folio, AJR, CJR etc.) or on the Internet if they demonstrate high standards in the practice of the discipline.

 

 

CANDIDATE’S STATEMENT

Publication No. 14

Creative Work/Article

 

Lamb, Y.R. (Oct. 28, 2016). “African-American History Museum Does Justice to Women.” Women’s Media Center.  http://www.womensmediacenter.com/feature/entry/museum-of-african-american-history

 

Synopsis

The Women’s Media Center invited me to write about the stories and contributions of women as they relate to the Smithsonian National Museum of African-American History and Culture.

 

This publication meets criteria No. 10 set forth on page 10 in Appendix A of Recommendation 305-2015 as an Exemplary Creative/Professional Activity:

 

Criteria No. 10. Authorship of works such as articles, reviews, commentaries, multimedia, and/or other creative projects published or broadcast locally, nationally or internationally in newspapers, magazines, popular or industry-specific media (e.g., PR Tactics, JAE, Folio, AJR, CJR etc.) or on the Internet if they demonstrate high standards in the practice of the discipline.

Impact

The Smithsonian’s newest and 19th museum has created a sensation since its opening in September 2016. Nearly 3 million people around the world have stood in line to visit “the only national museum devoted exclusively to the documentation of African American life, history and culture,” with roughly 100,000 becoming members. The museum evokes an emotional response to its holdings — only a fraction of which, about 3,000 of 37,000 objects, are on display. It has elevated interest in history, genealogy and frank discussions about race.

This article captures some of the energy of those early days through the voices of curators, donors and visitors. As one misty-eyed woman visitor put it, “They told it all”—from Black Power to #BlackLivesMatter. They told the good, the bad, and the downright ugly, but it’s an inspiring kind of sensory overload that makes you want to come back for more.

“I’m sure the ancestors stood and applauded what we all saw,” said Carol Hector-Harris, who donated a fragile letter discovered in her great-great-grandmother’s ledger. In 1851, William Lloyd Garrison, publisher of The Liberator, wrote the letter to help her ancestor, Thomas H. Jones, secure lodging and avoid arrest under the Fugitive Slave Law.

 

“Everything my eyes fell upon, I was saying, ‘Oh my God!’ I had my hand over my mouth. I had my hand over my heart.”

“What a tribute! What a tribute to us. I can’t wait to go back.”

 

 

 

CANDIDATE’S STATEMENT

Publication No. 15

Creative Work/Article

 

Lamb, Y.R. (June 20, 2016). “Hanging at LeBron’s High School: A Sweet Night for the Akron Faithful.” ESPN/The Undefeated. http://theundefeated.com/features/hanging-at-lebrons-high-school/,

 

Impact

This article was written on deadline from the high school that LeBron James and I attended (at different times) on the night of the NBA Finals. In addition to capturing the excitement in Akron, it highlighted what LeBron means to our hometown and what a championship means to the region, which has gone a half-century without one in any pro sport. The article was published in ESPN’s newest website, TheUndefeated.com.

 

This publication meets criteria No. 10 set forth on page 10 in Appendix A of Recommendation 305-2015 as an Exemplary Creative/Professional Activity:

 

Criteria No. 10. Authorship of works such as articles, reviews, commentaries, multimedia, and/or other creative projects published or broadcast locally, nationally or internationally in newspapers, magazines, popular or industry-specific media (e.g., PR Tactics, JAE, Folio, AJR, CJR etc.) or on the Internet if they demonstrate high standards in the practice of the discipline.

 

 

 

CANDIDATE’S STATEMENT

Publication No. 16

Creative Work/Article

 

Lamb, Y.R. (June 10, 2014). “Shari Headley Stars at Home and in the Community.” Fierce online magazine. http://fierceforblackwomen.com/2014/06/10/shari-headley-stars-at-home-and-in-the-community/

 

Impact

This profile is an example of telling untold stories. It highlights a woman who has remained popular with the public and how she balances a career, caregiving and work in the community while remaining positive in the face of adversity. She received a 2013 President’s Volunteer Service Award under Barack Obama as well as praise from the founder of Saving Our Daughters.

 

This publication meets criteria No. 10 set forth on page 10 in Appendix A of Recommendation 305-2015 as an Exemplary Creative/Professional Activity:

 

Criteria No. 10. Authorship of works such as articles, reviews, commentaries, multimedia, and/or other creative projects published or broadcast locally, nationally or internationally in newspapers, magazines, popular or industry-specific media (e.g., PR Tactics, JAE, Folio, AJR, CJR etc.) or on the Internet if they demonstrate high standards in the practice of the discipline.

 

 

 

CANDIDATE’S STATEMENT

Publication No. 17

Creative Work/Article

 

Lamb, Y.R. (March 13, 2014). “Sweetie Pie’s Recipe for Business.” Fierce online magazine.  http://fierceforblackwomen.com/2014/03/13/sweetie-pies-recipe-for-business/

 

Impact

This article provided inspiration for women interested in starting their own businesses. It highlighted an entrepreneur who followed her dream and took it to a higher level with the help of Oprah Winfrey. The article also gained traction through Winfrey’s extensive media network and following.

 

This publication meets criteria No. 10 set forth on page 10 in Appendix A of Recommendation 305-2015 as an Exemplary Creative/Professional Activity:

 

Criteria No. 10. Authorship of works such as articles, reviews, commentaries, multimedia, and/or other creative projects published or broadcast locally, nationally or internationally in newspapers, magazines, popular or industry-specific media (e.g., PR Tactics, JAE, Folio, AJR, CJR etc.) or on the Internet if they demonstrate high standards in the practice of the discipline.

 

 

 

CANDIDATE’S STATEMENT

Publication No. 18

Creative Work/Article

 

Lamb, Y.R. (March/April 2013). “In Death, New Life: The Discovery of Unknown Graves at the University of Virginia Reveals the Institution’s Brush With Slavery.” The History Channel Magazine.

 

Impact

Archeologists discovered the sacred ground of 67 African-American children and adults, possibly dating back to slavery, while investigating the suitability of land to expand north of the University of Virginia Cemetery and Columbarium. Some graves are thought to be those of enslaved people who brought Thomas Jefferson’s dream of an “Academical Village” to life. Some of them worked on the construction of these buildings, and others were at the beck and call of faculty and students.

 

Ervin Jordan Jr., associate professor, research archivist and Civil War scholar who is writing a book on the history of slavery at UVA, Jordan points out that even Jefferson, who is known for his meticulous records, fell short when it came to documenting the life and death of African Americans working on his property, some of whom ended up at UVA. This article shed light on the discovery of graves nationwide and the issues surrounding preservation of ancestral remains against commercial interests in real estate and highways.

 

This publication meets criteria No. 10 set forth on page 10 in Appendix A of Recommendation 305-2015 as an Exemplary Creative/Professional Activity:

 

Criteria No. 10. Authorship of works such as articles, reviews, commentaries, multimedia, and/or other creative projects published or broadcast locally, nationally or internationally in newspapers, magazines, popular or industry-specific media (e.g., PR Tactics, JAE, Folio, AJR, CJR etc.) or on the Internet if they demonstrate high standards in the practice of the discipline.

 

CANDIDATE’S STATEMENT

Publication No. 19

Invited Book Chapter

 

Lamb, Y.R. (2013). “Daddy, My Brother Barack and Me.” BET on Black: African-American Women Celebrate Fatherhood in the Age of Barack Obama. Naasel, K.R., ed. (Memphis: Kifani Press).

 

Role

I was one of nearly two dozen women who wrote about their fathers, brothers, sons and mates to highlight the contributions of black men in our lives.

 

Impact/Recognition

This book won the 2014 Independent Publisher Book Award and has been praised for shattering stereotypes about black men and black fathers. My chapter explored my bond with my father despite divorce and distance, against the backdrop of Barack Obama’s first campaign for office.

 

This publication meets criteria No. 10 set forth on page 10 in Appendix A of Recommendation 305-2015 as an Exemplary Creative/Professional Activity:

 

Criteria No. 10. Authorship of works such as articles, reviews, commentaries, multimedia, and/or other creative projects published or broadcast locally, nationally or internationally in newspapers, magazines, popular or industry-specific media (e.g., PR Tactics, JAE, Folio, AJR, CJR etc.) or on the Internet if they demonstrate high standards in the practice of the discipline.

 

 

 

CANDIDATE’S STATEMENT

Publication No. 20

Two Invited Book Essays

 

Lamb, Y.R. (October 2012).Obamacare and the Wizards of Bad Behavior” and “The Art of the Diss.” Haternation: How Racism & Incivility Are Dividing Us. Foote, N., ed. University of North Texas.

 

Publisher’s Synopsis

“HaterNation: How Incivility & Racism Have Divided Us is an anthology of insightful essays compiled by veteran journalist, author and educator Neil Foote. Some of the nation’s top journalists and thought leaders discuss how incivility has become too commonplace in America, fueling hate and racist acts in a country that just four years ago celebrated the notion of a ‘post racial’ America.”

 

Impact

This ebook has been praised for adding context and analysis on race relations and the impact of the nation’s first black president. I was invited to write two essays on some of the myths surrounding the Affordable Care Act in “Obamacare and the Wizards of Bad Behavior” and another on subtle and overt racism against President Barack Obama in “The Art of the Diss.”

Chapter 6: “Obamacare and the Wizards of Bad Behavior”

Chapter 8: “The Art of the Diss”

These publications meets criteria No. 10 set forth on page 10 in Appendix A of Recommendation 305-2015 as an Exemplary Creative/Professional Activity:

 

Criteria No. 10. Authorship of works such as articles, reviews, commentaries, multimedia, and/or other creative projects published or broadcast locally, nationally or internationally in newspapers, magazines, popular or industry-specific media (e.g., PR Tactics, JAE, Folio, AJR, CJR etc.) or on the Internet if they demonstrate high standards in the practice of the discipline.

 

 

 

 

CANDIDATE’S STATEMENT

Publication No. 21

Article Collection: Research and Reporting

On the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act

 

Role

Researcher and writer

 

Impact

This collection of research and reporting on the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act is noteworthy because of the historic nature and importance of health reform as well as the vital need to enhance understanding and awareness among citizens, regardless of their stance. These articles brought much-needed attention to unreported and underreported aspects of health reform. They also provided customized content relevant to African Americans.

 

They are an outgrowth of my initial coverage of the inaugural three-day arguments at U.S. Supreme Court and later challenges there. In both cases, I was one of just a few African-American journalists credentialed to cover the proceedings. My work has appeared in a variety of publications and websites before, during and after the hearings, which have also been highlighted in my classes at Howard University as well as with high school students in the Urban Health Media Project under our $300,000 Kellogg grant. My research and preparation also included participation in a National Press Foundation webinar, seminars sponsored by the Association of Health Care Journalists and Kaiser Health News, along with a White House town hall and briefings with the Secretary of Health and other cabinet members.

 

The components of this compilation have been distributed to millions of people, including:

  • Picked up by other outlets such as TheBlackDaily.com and New America Media, a coalition of 3,000 ethnic publications and websites.

 

Representative Samples:

 

http://afro.com/obamacare-improved-nations-health/

 

This collection meets criteria No. 10 set forth on page 10 in Appendix A of Recommendation 305-2015 as an Exemplary Creative/Professional Activity:

 

Criteria No. 10. Authorship of works such as articles, reviews, commentaries, multimedia, and/or Authorship of works such as articles, reviews, commentaries, multimedia, and/or other creative projects published or broadcast locally, nationally or internationally in newspapers, magazines, popular or industry-specific media (e.g., PR Tactics, JAE, Folio, AJR, CJR etc.) or on the Internet if they demonstrate high standards in the practice of the discipline. This can include:

  • A collection of short reported pieces about a single subject or a substantive collection on diverse subjects.

 

 

 

CANDIDATE’S STATEMENT

Publication No. 22

Creative Work/A Series of Articles

 

Title: Women’s Media Center

 

Author(s): Lamb, Yanick Rice

 

Impact

The Women’s Media Center periodically invites me to write articles about new research and/or the contributions of a variety of women. These articles also help to highlight African-American women before an international audience from diverse backgrounds. Two have been included as separate publications. This collection includes three representative samples:

 

Pegged to the HBO film, my article on “Oprah Winfrey and the Immortal Reach of Henrietta Lacks” explains how Lacks’ HeLa cells have lived on as a medical gift that keeps on giving—without her knowledge or consent. The endless supply of HeLa cells allowed scientists to perform experiments that they couldn’t conduct on humans. The cells revolutionized science, contributing to advances in cloning, in vitro fertilization, chemotherapy, and treatments for Parkinson’s disease, AIDS, herpes, influenza, and polio. They even traveled into space on one of the first missions and yielded five Nobel Prizes for related research. No other human cells have ever been as viable in lab settings.

 

For a half-century, Henrietta Lacks’ family was unaware that her cells had lived on, contributing so much to so many. The revelation in a scientific journal in 1971 and Johns Hopkins’ subsequent requests for their own blood samples evoked feelings of suspicion, confusion, and being disrespected.

 

“Dorothy Height: A Woman Who Wore Many Hats” coincided with the release of a new stamp in her honor, highlighting her leadership and influence on presidents: Dorothy Irene Height blended substance with style as she tackled gender and racial issues. You never saw Height without a hat. She had lots of them: Blue hats. Green hats. A high-topped cranberry hat with roses. A white-sequined halo. Fuchsia spirals trimmed in black. Some of her nearly 300 hats are now at the Smithsonian.

 

Little kids knew Height as the hat lady. Grown folks knew not to let the hats fool them. For under those hats was a woman of intellect with a mind that stayed sharp until the day she died at age 98 in 2010. The world celebrated her life with three days of tribute—a ceremony by Delta Sigma Theta, Inc. at Howard University, where her sorority was founded; a public viewing at the headquarters of her beloved National Council of Negro Women, where she had served as president for four decades; and a funeral at Washington National Cathedral, filled with mourners wearing all sorts of hats in her honor.

 

“Gwen Ifill’s Profound Impact on African-American Women” explained how and why the respected journalists made a difference. People around the world were stunned by reports of the 61-year-old Ifill’s death from cancer — two days before she was to receive the 2016 John Chancellor Award for Excellence in Journalism at Columbia University. Everyone from President Obama to people on the street praised the way in which she protected “the public’s right to know” throughout her career, most recently as moderator and managing editor of Washington Week as well as co-anchor and managing editor of PBS NewsHour.

 

However, her loss is especially profound for African-American journalists, especially women. The pool of black journalists covering national politics is small, and it’s even tinier for coveted beats like the White House and presidential campaigns, of which Ifill covered seven.

 

This collection meets criteria No. 10 set forth on page 10 in Appendix A of Recommendation 305-2015 as an Exemplary Creative/Professional Activity:

 

Criteria No. 10. Authorship of works such as articles, reviews, commentaries, multimedia, and/or Authorship of works such as articles, reviews, commentaries, multimedia, and/or other creative projects published or broadcast locally, nationally or internationally in newspapers, magazines, popular or industry-specific media (e.g., PR Tactics, JAE, Folio, AJR, CJR etc.) or on the Internet if they demonstrate high standards in the practice of the discipline. This can include:

  • A collection of short reported pieces about a single subject or a substantive collection on diverse subjects.

 

 

 

CANDIDATE’S STATEMENT

Publication No. 23

Creative Work/Article Collection

 

Research and Reporting on Health and Fitness

 

Role

Researcher and writer

 

Impact

This collection of research and reporting on health and fitness is noteworthy because of the scope and reach of the publications; their individual and collective impact; and their societal, journalistic and historical contributions. These articles bring much-needed attention to unreported and underreported topics. This is significant, because coverage of such topics can increase understanding among various segments of the population; present solutions to problems; or stimulate efforts to solve them.

 

Members of the general public as well as some medical experts have come to respect and value my body of work on health care and social issues. My work has stood out for my ability to review the literature and sort through the research to write, assign and edit reader-friendly and relevant articles. I am able to translate medical jargon and complex information into lay terms while writing articles that also resonate with the medical community or elected officials. This includes several articles for TheGrio.com, ranging from the salt in children’s diets to the mental health effects of televised tragedies, such as the Boston Marathon bombing.

 

The articles on the International AIDS Conference are significant because of the disproportionate impact of HIV/AIDS on people of color throughout the world, the lack of understanding of the disease, stigma and the lack of awareness on promising developments. In addition, this was the first time that the conference had been held in the United States in two decades. The conference consumed the entire Washington Convention Center as well as other venues. The scope of the conference, along with the intricacies of HIV/AIDS required extensive research beforehand, careful analysis in determining the significance of the findings presented, and measured reporting in telling what was noteworthy.

 

Some of these articles have been distributed to millions of readers through outlets such as:

 

Representative Samples

 

This collection meets criteria No. 10 set forth on page 10 in Appendix A of Recommendation 305-2015 as an Exemplary Creative/Professional Activity:

 

Criteria No. 10. Authorship of works such as articles, reviews, commentaries, multimedia, and/or Authorship of works such as articles, reviews, commentaries, multimedia, and/or other creative projects published or broadcast locally, nationally or internationally in newspapers, magazines, popular or industry-specific media (e.g., PR Tactics, JAE, Folio, AJR, CJR etc.) or on the Internet if they demonstrate high standards in the practice of the discipline. This can include:

  • A collection of short reported pieces about a single subject or a substantive collection on diverse subjects.

 

 

 

CANDIDATE’S STATEMENT

Publication No. 24

Creative Work/Article Collection

 

Research and Reporting on Social Issues and Politics

 

Role

Researcher and writer

 

Impact

This collection of research and reporting on political and social issues is noteworthy because of the scope and reach of the Black Press; the individual and collective impact of the newspapers and websites; and their societal, journalistic and historical contributions. These articles bring much-needed attention to unreported and underreported topics such as minimum wage and pay equity; the pain of losing a child to violence; and disproportionate incarceration and execution. This is significant, because coverage of such topics can increase understanding among various segments of the population; present solutions to problems; or stimulate efforts to solve them.

 

Representative Samples

 

These articles have been distributed to thousands of readers through the Afro-American Newspapers and fellow NNPA members:

  • Afro-American Newspapers:12,767 in print; on the web, 7,070 daily unique visitors and 35,350 page views
  • National Newspaper Publishers Association: circulates to 200 member newspapers

 

This collection meets criteria No. 10 set forth on page 10 in Appendix A of Recommendation 305-2015 as an Exemplary Creative/Professional Activity:

 

Criteria No. 10. Authorship of works such as articles, reviews, commentaries, multimedia, and/or Authorship of works such as articles, reviews, commentaries, multimedia, and/or other creative projects published or broadcast locally, nationally or internationally in newspapers, magazines, popular or industry-specific media (e.g., PR Tactics, JAE, Folio, AJR, CJR etc.) or on the Internet if they demonstrate high standards in the practice of the discipline. This can include:

  • A collection of short reported pieces about a single subject or a substantive collection on diverse subjects.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CANDIDATE’S STATEMENT

Publication No. 25

Research and Reporting on Lifestyles and Popular Culture

 

Role

Researcher and writer

 

Impact

This collection of research and reporting on lifestyles and other features help to provide balance to coverage of African Americans that’s far too often negative. In fact, coverage throughout the diaspora has a disproportionate focus on what I call the three Cs: coups, crisis and crime.

 

These articles highlight unreported and underreported topics and trends. Some of them are historic (Althea Gibson and Ruby Dee), some are serious (self-esteem issues and self-hatred due to discrimination, including colorism), some are heartfelt (my experience teaching at Howard) and some are light-hearted (popcorn addiction, the Capital Jazz Fest, tips for those who lose vacation days and grandmas who don’t want to be called grandma — such as yours truly, Nini).

 

Coverage of such topics can help to increase understanding among various segments of the population and “normalize” racial and ethnic groups often seen as the “other,” by sharing our achievements, the full range of our humanity, common interests and slices of everyday life. As the late journalist Les Payne often pointed out, for example, the media often acts as if it doesn’t snow on the homes of people of color during blizzards. When we’re out of sight and out of mind, it can have a snowball effect (pun intended) on more serious matters.

 

Writing such articles is also helpful in discussing different writing styles and topics with my students. They have been distributed to thousands of people, including:

  • Atlanta Journal-Constitution (ajc.com): 85 million monthly page views
  • Washington City Paper: 65,000 free copies distributed locally
  • com, the companion site for the Tom Joyner Morning Show, the No. 1 nationally syndicated radio programs with nearly 8 million listeners and 1.5 million unique visitors monthly on its website
  • Afro-American Newspapers12,767 in print; on the web, 7,070 daily unique visitors and 35,350 page views
  • National Newspaper Publishers Association: circulates to 200 member newspapers
  • com: 100,000 unique visitors
  • Howard Magazine: 80,000 copies

 

This publication meets criteria No. 10 set forth on page 10 in Appendix A of Recommendation 305-2015 as an Exemplary Creative/Professional Activity:

 

Criteria No. 10. Authorship of works such as articles, reviews, commentaries, multimedia, and/or other creative projects published or broadcast locally, nationally or internationally in newspapers, magazines, popular or industry-specific media (e.g., PR Tactics, JAE, Folio, AJR, CJR etc.) or on the Internet if they demonstrate high standards in the practice of the discipline.

Representative Samples

 

 

 

 

CANDIDATE’S STATEMENT

Publication No. 26

Creative Work/Special Project

TruthBeTold.news

 

Roles

  • Founder of fact-checking site news
  • Principal investigator on $35,000 Challenge Grant for Innovation in Journalism Education
  • Leader/member of teaching team on accountability journalism

Synopsis

TruthBeTold.news (formerly called HU Insight) is a non-profit, non-partisan website and digital network, run and edited from Howard University’s Department of Media, Journalism and Film in the Cathy Hughes School of Communications. This fact-checking site uses journalistic skills and crowdsourced information to play a leading role in examining claims about the black community in public debate, including myths, stereotypes and false statements. It also serves as a fun but, serious learning environment for students to teach them advanced reporting tools in a way that is engaging and allows them to use the social media skills they already possess.

 

APT Criteria

My management, research and development of TruthBeTold.news meets criteria No. 8 set forth on page 9 in Appendix A of Recommendation 305-2015 as an Exemplary Creative/Professional Activity and No. 10 on page 11 under High Creative/Professional Activity:

Criteria No 8. Development or application of technology for communication enterprises or for the educational community, including new and existing websites; regularly maintained and nationally recognized web logs (blogs) and video logs (vlogs)

 

Criteria No. 10. Development and management of meritorious special projects of an academic or professional nature that exceed normal expectations of teaching and/or instruction and supervision of co-curricular programs, and that achieve recognition on local, regional, national or international level and/or other targeted area deemed of significance. The candidate must also prepare a detailed report and critique of the activity. 

 

Impact

Long before the fury over fake news and alternative facts, TruthBeTold.news made its debut as one of 11 winners of the 2015-16 Challenge Fund for Innovation in Journalism Education, administered by the Online News Association. It launched on Nov. 10, 2015, pegged to a Republican presidential debate that coincided with one of its primary fact-checks at the time, “Can Ben Carson Help GOP Attract Black Voters?” The launch immediately established the site as a fresh and relevant source of news and verification.

 

According to the American Press Institute, TruthBeTold.news might be the first and only collegiate fact-checking site. It is considered the only fact-checking site that focuses on African Americans. Professional partners include PolitiFact; the National Newspaper Publishers Association, which represents 200 black-owned weeklies; and the Trice Edney News Wire. We have also had inquiries about partnerships from news outlets ranging from The Undefeated at ESPN to the Associated Press.

 

Through TruthBeTold.news, Howard students delve into the finer points of fact-checking journalism, also known as accountability journalism. Specifically, they learn how to use advanced reporting tools and social media in engaging ways to examine issues that resonate with African Americans. While nearly all of the content originates with students, we’ve featured the work of two accomplished alumni: Jelani Cobb, a writer at the New Yorker, and Shirley Carswell, former deputy managing editor of the Washington Post.

 

Fact-checking journalism has emerged as a critical part of American journalism over the last decade. The number of fact-check stories grew by 300 percent between 2008 and 2012, according to the American Press Institute. And PolitiFact, owned and operated by the Tampa Bay Times, was the first fact-checking site to win a Pulitzer Prize.

 

“However, few, if any, sites are devoted specifically to examining issues of importance to the African-American community,” said Ron Nixon, a Washington correspondent for the New York Times, co-founder of the Ida B. Wells Society and former adjunct at Howard, who first proposed the idea for TruthBeTold.news.

 

Ranging from politics to pop culture, fact-checks on TruthBeTold.news include:

 

One of the most popular fact-checks on the site is “Does a Dollar Spent in the Black Community Really Stay There for Only Six Hours?” Many individuals, organizations, bloggers and news outlets have used the six-hour figure almost as conventional wisdom in attempts to show that blacks spend little with businesses in their neighborhoods compared to other racial and ethnic groups. The lifespan of a dollar is supposedly 28 days in the Asian community and 19 days in the Jewish community. TruthBeTold.news examined the validity of these statistics as well as the methodology behind them.

 

Although the site focuses on an underserved audience of African Americans, people of all backgrounds enjoy the content. The site also has an open-source orientation and public service mission, making its content available to any news organization for re-publication.

 

The site has been well-received by students and especially readers who have called it “brilliant,” “awesome” and “a great idea.” One reader thanked us and said: “The next challenge will be tackling beliefs. Too many folks will hold tightly to their beliefs no matter the evidence to the contrary. But this, what you are doing, is what good journalism is about — fact and truth instead of knee-jerk reactions to falsehoods. Brava!”

 

We’ve attracted praise from journalists, too. “This is the kind of old school, basic reporting that journalism schools need to stress,” said Jack White, former Time Magazine columnist. The New York Times’ Best of the Web singled out TruthBeTold.news in The Upshot, the American Press Institute wrote about our launch and the Nieman Lab at Harvard University featured a profile of the site.

 

Audio, TV/film and journalism majors work under the supervision of professionals as well as faculty members. Guest speakers have included Angie Drobnic Holan, editor of Politifact, and Tom Glaisyer, director of the Informed Participation Program at the Democracy Fund, one of the foundations supporting the Challenge Grant.

 

Milestones at a Glance

  • Established one-credit and three-credit fact-checking courses, featuring guest lecturers from PolitiFact and the American Press Institute
  • Incorporated fact-checking in other classes, including Multimedia Storytelling, NewsVision, News Lab and Public Affairs Reporting
  • Helped students understand the rigor and critical thinking involved in fact-checking, and raised the bar on what’s acceptable for TruthBeTold.news versus other campus outlets
  • Honored with Mark of Excellence Award as best independent website, Society of Professional Journalists, Region 2, Richmond, Va.
  • Won Salute to Excellence Award from the National Association of Black Journalist (NABJ) for a collaboration by a film major and a broadcast journalism student on “Is D.C. Still the Chocolate City?”
  • Received a Paul Robeson Award for “#OscarsSoWhite, Because #HollywoodSoWhite — and Male,” the lead story in a multimedia package that included a five-year analysis of academy membership by first and second-year students in Digital Media Literacy as well as a multi-class team of students reporting on Oscar night in real time via social media
  • Featured as the New York Times’ Best of the Web in The Upshot, the American Press Institute and the Nieman Lab at Harvard University
  • Students and faculty participated in panels and roundtables sponsored by NABJ, the Democracy Fund, the Social Media Technology Conference and a Fact-Checking Summit at the National Press Club.

Goals

  • Expand political coverage, including fact-checks and fake news reports for the 2018 midterm elections
  • Offer more fact-checks in real time, Quick Hits trending on social media and video verification
  • Monetize the site so that it is sustainable
  • Train students at other campuses, especially HBCUs
  • Hire a student staff
  • Participate in Constitution Day and other observances of press freedom
  • Publish a textbook on fact-checking
  • Air podcasts on Howard’s Sirius XM channels; partner with our campus and commercial stations’ radio programs as well as WHUT, our PBS TV station
  • Develop a project related to student activism, a hot topic on campuses

 

 

 

 

CANDIDATE’S STATEMENT

Publication No. 27

Creative Work/Special Project:

Howard University News Service

 

Title: Howard University News Service (HUNS)

HUNewsService.com (under re-construction) and http://howarduniversityelectionproject.com

 

Synoposis

HUNewsService.com reports on education, health, business, government and politics, religion, arts and entertainment, sports and other topics. It doubles as a destination site and a news service, disseminating student content nationally. Our media partners value our coverage and regularly publish news service content on their websites and in their newspapers. They also welcome our students’ drive and timeliness, often commissioning exclusive articles from our students.

 

News service content has been used by the Washington Post, the Washington Examiner, CNN iReport, TheRoot.com, BlackAmericaWeb.com, the Trice-Edney News Wire, Human Nature magazine, Trentonian.com and many of the 200 member publications and websites of the National Newspaper Publishers Association, including the Baltimore and Washington Afro-American, the Washington Informer, the Los Angeles Sentinel and the Chicago Defender.

 

Additionally, we distribute content for other campus media, such as NewsVision, TruthBeTold.news and 101Magazine.net (both websites that I also established). We also share HUNS content with these sites as well as The Hilltop to minimize duplication of effort.

 

APT Criteria

My management, research and development of HUNewsService.com meets criteria No. 8 set forth on page 9 in Appendix A of Recommendation 305-2015 as an Exemplary Creative/Professional Activity and No. 10 on page 11 under High Creative/Professional Activity:

Criteria No 8. Development or application of technology for communication enterprises or for the educational community, including new and existing websites; regularly maintained and nationally recognized web logs (blogs) and video logs (vlogs)

 

Criteria No. 10. Development and management of meritorious special projects of an academic or professional nature that exceed normal expectations of teaching and/or instruction and supervision of co-curricular programs, and that achieve recognition on local, regional, national or international level and/or other targeted area deemed of significance. The candidate must also prepare a detailed report and critique of the activity. 

 

Role and Impact

I serve as adviser and an editor in the management of the award-winning HUNewsService.com. I’m available to coach students, edit content and upload it to the site whenever breaking news would be of interest to our audience and media partners. With its 24/7 news cycle and position in the nation’s capital, the news service is a “meritorious special project of an academic and professional nature that exceeds normal expectations of teaching and supervision of co-curricular programs,” according to Appendix A of Recommendation 305-2015.

 

Under my direction, HUNewsService.com has achieved recognition on a regional and national level, standing out in particular for the hyper-local coverage that I developed along with its election coverage of local, gubernatorial and national races, including the forthcoming midterm elections. Capstone reporting students are assigned to each of the District of Columbia’s eight wards. The news service is often alone in covering underserved neighborhoods in Wards 7 and 8. It also brings much-needed attention to unreported and underreported topics. This is significant, because coverage of such topics can increase understanding among various segments of the population; present solutions to problems; or stimulate efforts to solve them. It is important to note that the Washington Post and other general-market media organizations have cut back on local coverage, further exacerbating what has been recognized nationally as “media deserts” in this region.

 

HUNewsService.com has received awards from the Society of Professional Journalists, Hearst and NABJ. With one of the oldest collegiate-industry partnerships, HUNS is considered an exemplar, and other universities are developing similar programs. Many schools have emulated our political coverage, and some have partnered with us, such as Boston University and Morgan State University for the 2012 and 2016 presidential elections, respectively.

 

I also helped to organize trips with students and faculty to the 2016 Republican National Convention in Cleveland and the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia. Howard was one of only two undergraduate programs in the nation that covered both the RNC and DNC. Our students worked alongside professional journalists in the press area, beating some of them on stories in term of their enterprise reporting as well as their agility and news judgment in using real-time tools such as Facebook Live. Some of the coverage since 2012 is housed on a micro-site at http://howarduniversityelectionproject.com.

 

In addition to the accomplishments above, my other activities have included:

  • Expanding the HUNS umbrella by developing TruthBeTold.news — the only collegiate fact-checking site in the country
  • Working with students across sequences and departments — in addition to my own —  to help them report, revise and post content online.
  • Taking students to Capitol Hill; the National Press Club; the Newseum; governmental agencies; and local news organizations.
  • Serving as a reviewer of Capstone Portfolio Presentations in which students prepare a comprehensive professional/academic portfolio (including a self-assessment of their application of the nine ACEJMC standards) and discuss their careers as student journalists, their beats and final projects. Professional journalists, recruiters, other faculty members and alumni also critique the presentations.

 

 

 

CANDIDATE’S STATEMENT

Publication No. 28

 

Creative Works: Special Project

 

Title: 101 Magazine and 101Magazine.net

 

Principal Investigator, Founder and Adviser: Lamb, Yanick Rice

 

Published by Howard University

 

APT Criteria

My management, research and development of 101 Magazine meets criteria No. 8 set forth on page 9 in Appendix A of Recommendation 305-2015 as an Exemplary Creative/Professional Activity and No. 10 on page 11 under High Creative/Professional Activity:

 

Criteria No 8. Development or application of technology for communication enterprises or for the educational community, including new and existing websites; regularly maintained and nationally recognized web logs (blogs) and video logs (vlogs)

 

Criteria No. 10. Development and management of meritorious special projects of an academic or professional nature that exceed normal expectations of teaching and/or instruction and supervision of co-curricular programs, and that achieve recognition on local, regional, national or international level and/or other targeted area deemed of significance. The candidate must also prepare a detailed report and critique of the activity. 

 

Synopsis

101 is a general-interest magazine that knows how to have fun, when to be serious and what it takes to hold the attention of 18 to 29-year-old students who are busy chasing their dreams. 101 has an urban sensibility with a global outlook. Although based in the United States, 101 strives to offer a world view with a mix of domestic and international topics. It includes news, features, analysis, commentary, service and trend pieces; profiles; and gazettes.

 

101 serves a diverse group of men and women who want to stay in the know about issues that affect their lives. They are intelligent, progressive and upwardly mobile. They want more than the standard fare being offered in other magazines targeting them, because there is more to the hip-hop generation than hip-hop, as one student explained.

 

Impact

In addition to drawing upon my years of magazine experience, I have conducted extensive research on the state of diversity in magazine publishing, innovation and technology, magazine journalism curriculum at peer institutions, new magazine launches, and the various types of magazines targeted to college students and other young adults. This has equipped me to build a magazine ecosystem that includes magazine modules and courses; 101 in print and online as part of an emerging digital network; an array of potential brand extensions; the Cover 2 Cover student magazine association; an annual magazine and digital media conference; and networking opportunities to build on the a student-organized tour of New York companies.

101 is significant for many reasons. First and foremost, it serves as a training ground to help increase media ownership across lines of race, ethnicity and gender in accordance with the university’s push toward entrepreneurship in recent years. Similarly, it is also helping to diversify staffing and management in magazine publishing, a field that is far less integrated than newspapers, radio and television — so much so that it has traditionally been reluctant to release demographic figures on hiring, retention and promotion.

Students involved with 101 have landed internships and full-time employment at Time, ESPN, National Geographic, the Washingtonian, InStyle, GQ, Cosmopolitan, Esquire, Essence, Ebony, Heart & SoulComplex, BuzzFeed, TheRoot.com, Blavity.com and SBNation.com. Their work has also been recognized. The Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (AEJMC) awarded a first-place award to a 101 profile in 2012. Through the Society of Professional Journalist’ Region 2, 101 won first place as Best Student Magazine and was a finalist for a profile of CHSOC Career Development Director Carol Dudley.

At Howard, 101 is helping to fill a void by meeting the demand of students across disciplines who are clamoring for instruction and opportunities in magazine publishing, including digital media components. 101 combines research and experiential training to prepare diverse students for all facets of magazine publishing. It has also helped address the needs of the growing number of students majoring in journalism, advertising, public relations, business, law and other areas who are interested in starting or working for magazines. To that end, they are gaining hands-on experience in developing an international business targeted to undergraduate and graduate students of all backgrounds.

101 provides an opportunity for faculty and students to learn about the media transformation in real time as print increasingly shifts to various digital platforms. I am helping students learn how magazines are developing into multimedia brands, and they are coming up with ideas for 101 brand extensions, including a pop-up magazine to bring the contents to life on stage. We are working on a redesign. We have been experimenting with storytelling in other forms such as using Instagram series, webisodes, SoundCloud and Snapchat. This is in addition to traditional long-form journalism and shorter articles.

Students work for 101 on their own as well as through a series of one-credit Co-Curricular courses that I developed with the 2013 reorganization of the CHSOC. I have also implemented magazine modules to incorporate 101 in various classes, such as reporting, editing, magazine writing and fact-checking. Although students often grumble about group projects, they have enjoyed working in teams to plan issues of 101. In addition, I have developed a Media Entrepreneurship and Innovation course for students in all CHSOC majors, including those inspired by 101 to develop their own magazines.

For the final project in Interactive Editing class, students are required to research an article idea of national or international interest, identify a non-Howard writer, explain the idea in an assignment letter to the writer and plan multimedia. They must monitor writing and production deadlines, edit various drafts of the story and upload the multimedia package to 101’s website. This is a real-life assignment that they could expect to carry out on a magazine staff. We also pair editors and reporters across classes to foster peer and experiential learning. Even as “digital natives,” students are excited about publishing print editions. They are wrapping up a print issue for the fall semester; new classes will work on one for next spring.

Impressed by the scope and potential of this exciting student venture, Dori J. Maynard, president of the Robert C. Maynard Institute for Journalism Education, had requested an article about 101 magazine. The institute encourages “diversity in staffing, content and business operations” at U.S. media companies. In addition, a Smithsonian representative expressed interest in incorporating 101 as added value for members.

Application of Theory

101 Magazine covers aspects of my research agenda — employment, management, entrepreneurship and coverage as they relate to diversity in digital and print media. It allows me the opportunity to merge my journalism experience with the management theories that I learned in the MBA program at Howard and to infuse both into my scholarship and teaching. It’s crucial that our undergraduate and graduate students understand the business implications that impact journalism, especially since so many of them want to start or work for magazines. Through 101 Magazine, students are gaining an eye-opening experience on what it takes to achieve their goals and the realities of running a magazine — or any business.

Research on racial and ethnic groups in magazine publishing is sorely lacking. My experiences in magazine publishing — especially in light of the revolutionary changes in journalism — has demonstrated the importance of focusing on entrepreneurship and management, as well as the need to research magazines as the cornerstone of digital media operations.

101 allows Howard University students and contributors from other schools to step out of their comfort zones to prepare them for the reality of serving broader audiences at various points in their careers. When I worked at the New York Times, Child magazine and Essence, for example, I had to develop a broad base of contacts and propose ideas that resonated with a diversity of readers. Students are learning that they must push harder and go deeper.

 

 

  1. Patents Held

~N/A~

 

 

  1. Teaching Experience

 

  1. Courses Taught Attach Teaching Evaluations, if available

(Descriptions taken directly from the University Bulletin. Unless otherwise specified, scores are overall averages.)

JOUR 201. Writing for the Media (formerly Fundamentals of Journalism). 3 crs. Develops in the student a sense of news value; introduces basic news reporting techniques; develops news writing skills; familiarizes the student with journalism ethics and copy editing symbols.

Taught: Fall 2012, Summer 2014

Mean Student Evaluation Score: 4.16 (over comparative institutional mean of 3.99)

JOUR 202. Reporting and Writing; Reporting and Writing (Magazines). 3 crs. Emphasizes actual writing and reporting under newsroom conditions; provides intensive experience in gathering and writing news under deadline pressure. Developed a section focusing on magazines to meet student interest.

Taught: Fall 2012, Spring 2013 (two sections), Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

 

Spring 2013 (JOUR 202-07) Mean Student Evaluation Score: 4.22 (comparative institutional mean: 4.01)

 

Spring 2013 (JOUR 202-04) Mean Student Evaluation Score: 4.15 (comparative institutional mean/; 4.01)

 

Spring 2013 Classroom Visitation Evaluation: 90%

JOUR 308. Copy Editing (now Interactive Editing). 3 crs. Overall view of the editorial concept, with emphasis on the copy editor’s job and editing copy manually as well as on the computer. Revamped course to include higher-level editing and planning as well as peer editing of work produced in reporting classes and for campus media outlets.

Taught: Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2014, Spring 2015

 

Fall 2012 Mean Student Evaluation Score 4.00 (comparative institutional mean: 4.01)

 

Spring 2013 Mean Student Evaluation Score 3.67 (comparative institutional mean: 4.01)

JOUR 403. Feature Writing for Newspapers and Magazines aka Interactive Feature Writing. 3 crs. Revamped course on the theory and practice of feature writing for publications, including critical inspection of published examples.

Taught:  Spring 2013 to Spring 2016

 

JOUR 410. Directed Study. 3 crs.

  • Broadcast Journalism II, Spring 2013
  • NewsVision, Spring 2013
  • Audio Storytelling, Summer 2014

 

MJFC 415, 431. Directed Study. 3 crs.

  • Multimedia Storytelling, Summer 2016, Summer 2017
  • Magazine Writing, Summer 2017
  • Interactive Editing, Summer 2018

 

MJFC 300 and 304. Co-Curricular Journalism: 101 Magazine I, II and III (cross-listed). 1 cr. Developed multimedia lab course for 101Magazine.net and 101 Magazine.

 

Taught: Fall 2015, Spring 2016, Fall 2016, Spring 2017, Summer 2017, Fall 2017, Spring 2018, Summer 2018, Fall 2018

 

Spring 2018 Classroom Visitation Evaluation: 99%

 

MJFC 221-03. Contemporary Topics: Media Entrepreneurship & Innovation. 3 crs. Developed a course blending theory, practice and real-life business presentation students in majors across the department and school. Created as an outgrowth of a Scripps Howard Foundation entrepreneurial education fellowship at Arizona State University’s Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communications.

 

Taught: Spring 2018

 

Mean Student Evaluation Score: 4.33 (effective to very effective on 5-point scale)

 

 

MJFC 400-01. Magazine Writing. 3 crs. Revamped course on the theory and practice of feature writing and in-depth reporting for multi-platform magazines, including critical inspection of published examples by professional and student journalists.

 

Taught: Spring 2017

 

MJFC 315-04, 430-01. TruthBeTold.news Fact-Checking Course. 3 crs. Cross-listed with MJFC 300-01. Co-Curricular: TruthBeTold.news. 1 cr. An intensive journalism course on fact-checking and analysis to use research and reporting to verify or disprove myths, stereotypes and other statements about African Americans. Developed the course through a Challenge Grant for Innovation in Journalism Education.

 

Team-Taught: Fall 2015, Spring 2016, Fall 2016

 

MJFC 456-01. Practicum. 1 cr.

 

Taught: Summer 2014, Summer 2017, Summer 2018

 

Evaluation of Actual Faculty Performance on Teaching

2012-13     4.625 “High” to “Exemplary” (on 5-point scale)

2013-14     5.00 “Exemplary” (on 5-point scale)

2014-15     5.00 “Exemplary” (on 5-point scale)

2015-16     5.00 “Exemplary” (on 5-point scale)       

2016-17     5.00 “Exemplary” (on 5-point scale)

2017-18     5.00 “Exemplary” (on 5-point scale)

 

* Course reductions as interim assistant chair, 2013 to 2015, and as chair, 2015 to present.

 

            B. Theses or Dissertations Directed

 

N/A

 

            C. Theses or Dissertation Committees

 

MFA in Film Program: Syrina Ingram, Vincent Pendarvis, Erik Humphrey and Sandy Waters

 

  1. Contributions to Teaching

 

  1. National Reputation – My national reputation as a journalist has followed me into the academy. My distinguished professional experience spans nearly four decades and includes top roles at such world-renown news organizations as The New York Times. I am recognized and respected as a leader and expert in newspaper and magazine journalism, media management, convergence and diversity. I am one of a handful of journalists who have had the opportunity to run two national magazines: BET Weekend and Heart & Soul. I’ve also held leadership positions in the National Association of Black Journalists, serving two terms as president of its largest chapter in New York and as a founding member of NABJ’s Digital Journalism Task Force and Educators Task Force. In addition, I am a diversity consultant for the Society of Professional Journalists.

 

As a result, I am consulted about journalism education, for interviews about journalistic issues and current events, for presentations on diversity and professional development, and for my experiences on making the transition from the newsroom to the classroom.

 

I have been interviewed by the Howard University Radio Network, BBC, CBS, National Public Radio (NPR), the Washington Post, USA Today, The Tavis Smiley Show, Radio One stations and BlackAmericaWeb.com, the website of the nationally syndicated Tom Joyner Morning Show. I am also in the CNN database as a source for television interviews. My extensive network of contacts has also been useful in attracting speakers to Howard and in helping our students secure internships and full-time jobs.

 

  1. Honors – To enrich and maintain the legacy of journalism education at Howard University, I have participated in a number of fellowships for teaching, ethics, health reporting, investigative journalism and other areas. I received the AEJMC Council of Affiliates Second Annual Industry Research Award for my research on how newspapers and magazines use tablets, which has been incorporated in my classes. I’ve also eceived many national and local proclamations and awards, as well as awards from Women in Communications and NABJ.

 

Under my leadership, campus media outlets such as TruthBeTold.news, HUNewsService.com, 101 Magazine as well as individual students have received awards from the Society of Professional Journalists, Hearst and NABJ.

 

  1. Curriculum – I have played a leadership role in revamping the journalism curriculum as well as helping to implement changes and document the overall curriculum for the new Department of Media, Journalism and Film. This has included helping to enhance multiplatform projects by expanding our curriculum, revamping courses, integrating database reporting, acquiring and using more technology, increasing training opportunities, and joining with other sequences, department, universities and media companies on various projects. Our curriculum is at the forefront of peer institutions.

 

  1. Technology – I have been a member of the Technology Committee and involved with developing a future Media Innovation Center (formerly the Converged Media Lab). Over the years, I have increasingly integrated multimedia reporting, editing and producing in my classes. My students also incorporate social media in their reporting, including live tweeting events and using Storify to curate news and social media in one place for readers. I’ve learned to use various video and audio editing software. My students are comfortable using a range of equipment, but they have also learned to shoot video, collect audio and file stories remotely using their smartphones.

 

I make every effort to keep my skills fresh. I regularly engage in technology-related professional development to enhance my classroom instruction. I’m a founding member of NABJ’s Digital Journalism Task Force and a member of the Online News Association. I’m a regular at CETLA and have taken all of the classes on preparing Digital Portfolios and using the Blackboard course management system, which has always been an integral part of all of my classes.

 

  1. Experiential and Service-Learning – All of my classes incorporate experiential learning, and I’ve been involved in service learning through a Kellogg grant to train high school students to cover health disparities. Our Capstone classes still use the model that I developed for hyperlocal coverage of Washington’s eight wards, particular underserved neighborhoods and untold stories.

 

  1. Advising and Mentoring – I have mentored journalism students, alumni and graduate students across the university. I have served on the thesis committees of four MFA students after serving previously for Annenberg Honors students. I’ve always served as faculty adviser for dozens of students across sequences, and during the past year I coordinated a broader advising role for a dozen faculty members. Feedback has been good. I am adviser to the Howard University News Service; 101 Magazine; and Cover 2 Cover, an interdisciplinary student magazine association that has assisted me in organizing a national magazine conference at Howard, which had more of a digital focus in 2018.

 

  1. Leadership – I currently serve as chair of the department. I have also represented the Cathy Hughes School of Communications on the University’s Budget Advisory Council and served as an alternate on the Faculty Senate. Previously, I was interim assistant chair in Media, Journalism and Film, and I served on the Department of Journalism’s Executive Committee as coordinator of the Print/Online Journalism Sequence. Additionally, I took the lead in helping to launch and coordinate coverage of national and local elections, as well as reporting delegations to the Republican and Democratic national conventions (RNC and DNC).

 

  1. Contributions to Field or Profession

(Panel presentations, speeches, talks at professional meetings, conferences, symposia, workshops, seminars, etc.)

  • Please see Service section below and CV.

 

  1. Research
  2. Grants for Which You Have Applied

UNFUNDED/PENDING:

  • Various grants for the Department of Media, Journalism and Film
  • 2017 National Endowment for the Humanities, $240,000 Community Conversations Grant, an interdisciplinary collaboration of Communications, Business, Architecture and Fine Arts, led by Principal Investigator Natalie Hopkinson, Ph.D. for the proposed project, “1968: Fifty Years of Race and Urban Transformation: A Public Conversation.” This was an outgrowth of Howard University’s 2017 Summer Faculty Research Retreat. (Seeking alternate funding.)

 

  1. Funded Grants
  • 2018-19 2018, Social Justice Investigative Journalism Fellowship, Schuster Institute for Investigative Journalism at Brandeis University, $8,800 for environmental health series to research impact of rubber factories on health in Northeast Ohio
  • 2016-present. W.K. Kellogg Grant; $300,000 to develop the Urban Health Media to train high school students to cover health disparities in Washington and Baltimore under the leadership of Howard University Trustee Reed Tuckson, M.D., and Jayne O’Donnell, USA Today, health policy reporter, in collaboration with Morgan State University.
  • 2016, NBCUniversal Grant; $5,000 to sponsor “NewsVision” on WHUT-TV. (Collaborated with Professor Jennifer Thomas, executive producer)
  • 2015-present, Online News Association Challenge Fund for Innovation in Journalism Education Grant; $35,000 to develop news, a student-run fact-checking website.
  • 2013, Moorland-Spingarn Research Center, one of five Summer Faculty Scholars Fellowships, $2,500 for “Telling Our Stories: Black Journalists Past and Present” to be presented during the MSRC Fall Colloquium series.
  • 2012, AEJMC Council of Affiliates, one of three proposals selected for the Second Annual Industry Research Forum Award; $1,000 for “All the News That Fits on Tablets: An Analysis of News Consumption and Best Practices” to be presented at national AEJMC conference, August 2013 in Washington, D.C.
  1. Other Research (See Publications, above)

 

  1. Impact of Research

My research is focused on diversity in the following areas: employment, media management, entrepreneurship and coverage. Through basic and applied research, reporting and editing, I examine various aspects of multimedia journalism and magazine publishing, including:

  • Readership patterns
  • Recruitment, promotion and retention
  • Content analysis and decisions related to coverage, assignments, execution, frequency and placement
  • Unreported and under-reported people, places and issues.

 

The impact of my research has been reflected in awards and publication in books, including:

  • “All the News That Fits on Tablets: An Analysis of News Consumption and Best Practices.” (2013). AEJMC Council of Affiliates, Second Annual Industry Research Forum Award.
  • Abrahamson, D. and Prior-Miller, M., eds. (2015) The Routledge Handbook of Magazine Research: The Future of the Magazine Form: Research Perspectives and Prospects. New York: Peter Lang Publishing. Chapter 14, “Research Review: Communication and Consumer Lifestyle Behavior.” http://www.routledge.com/books/details/9781138854161/
  • Langmia, K., Tyree, T.C.M., O’Brien, P. and Sturgis, I., eds. (2013) Social Media: Pedagogy and Practice. Lanham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield, Ltd.: “The Seven Sisters and Their Siblings Go Digital: An Analysis of Women’s Magazine Content on Websites, iPads and Cell Phones,” with Kendra Desrosiers, MBA

 

Based on my research and expertise on diversity for nearly three decades, I am regularly called upon nationally for lectures, conferences, workshops, meetings, consultations, media interviews and publications. I extend this research and expertise to the classroom to convey the timeless message of the Kerner Commission and other lessons, while engaging and preparing them for our increasingly multicultural society.

 

This is especially important at an HBCU. While our students typically have an innate awareness of diversity in general because of their backgrounds, they sometimes lose sight of other diverse segments of the population. I emphasize that they must use their critical-thinking skills and expertise to address diversity, not only along racial and ethnic lines but also in terms of socio-economics, age, gender, religion, geography and sexual orientation. Such awareness increased my value to employers as well as my level of contribution, especially at an international news organization such as The New York Times and now at Howard University. This is one reason that I place such an emphasis on community reporting and that I’ve selected college students in general and not specifically HBCU students as the target audience for 101, our student lab magazine and website. This approach contributes to our efforts to develop “leadership for America and the global community.”

 

  1. Professional Development

           

(Seminars, Courses, Meetings and Workshops Attended)

 

  • Howard University Chair Leadership Academy, 2017-18
  • National Association of Black Journalists conference in New Orleans, 2017
  • Academic fellowship for Association of Health Care Journalists in Orlando, Fla., 2017
  • Selected as a returning John A. Hartford/Commonwealth Foundation Journalism in Aging & Health Fellow to attend and cover the Gerontological Society of America’s Annual Scientific Meeting, New Orleans, 2016
  • Age Boom Academy: The Future of Work and Retirement at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, 2016
  • Cancer Reporting Fellowship, National Institutes of Health, 2016
  • NABJ regional conference, Morgan State University, Baltimore, 2016
  • Association of Health Care Journalists, Cleveland, 2016
  • Scripps Howard Journalism Entrepreneurship Institute, Arizona State University, Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Media, Phoenix, January 2016
  • American Council on Education (ACE), Leadership Academy for Department Chairs, 2015
  • Provost’s Office monthly workshops and meetings for department chairs, 2015-present
  • “The Role of Nonprofit Media in a Vibrant Civil Society,”co-sponsored by the Council on Foundations at the Newseum, 2015
  • “Designing Ethics in the Digital Age,” Newseum, 2015
  • NABJ, Minneapolis, 2015
  • Cracking the Code, International Women’s Media Foundation Digital News Entrepreneurs Summit, New York, 2015
  • New U News Entrepreneurs Working Through Unity Boot Camp, AAJA, 2014
  • TIE X Boot Camp and Accelerator, Opportunity Hub, Atlanta, 2014
  • Rainbow PUSH Media Telecommunications Symposium, Washington, 2014
  • Hack the Gender Gap, PBS MediaShift/Google, West Virginia University, 2014
  • CollabSpace D.C., PBS MediaShift/Reynolds Journalism Institute, Washington Post, 2014
  • Howard University Center for Excellence in Teaching, Learning and Assessment (CETLA):
  • ID01 Designing Syllabi, June 2013, May 2014
  • BB18 Grading with Blackboard Rubrics, October 2012
  • Blackboard Training: three concurrent introductory sessions, plus advanced Blackboard techniques for online grade books
  • Engaging students
  • Assessments
  • Plagiarism
  • Equipment and white-board demonstrations
  • Knight Center for Journalism Massive Open Online Course (MOOC), “Introduction to Mobile Journalism,” June-August 2014
  • Selected as the John A. Hartford/MetLife Foundation Journalism in Aging & Health Fellow to attend and cover the Gerontological Society of America’s 66th Annual Scientific Meeting, New Orleans, Nov. 20-24, 2013
  • John Jay College Center on Media, Crime and Justice Fellowship on Health Behind Bars: What Obamacare Means for Courts, Prisons, Jails and the Justice-Involved (and How to Report It),” New York, Oct. 21 & 22, 2013
  • Online News Association national conference, Atlanta, October 2013
  • Knight Digital Media Center, University of California, Berkeley, and Ethics and Excellence in Journalism, Online Data Training for Journalists, four sessions on data visualization and mapping, February and March 2013
  • “Politics of Aging” Professional Reporting Fellowship sponsored by the International Longevity Center, the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health and the Columbia University Journalism School’s Continuing Education Division, December 2012
  • National Press Foundation, Twitter for Journalists webinar, October 2012
  • Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communications Conference, Washington, 2013

 

  1. Departmental, School or University Service

 

Department:

  • Serve as Chair, Department of Media, Journalism and Film, the largest unit in the Cathy Hughes School of Communications, 2015 to present
  • Serve on MJF Executive Committee, 2013 to present
  • Served as on-site editor for students at Republican National Convention in Cleveland and Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia; Howard was one of only two undergraduate programs in the U.S. to cover both, 2016
  • Presented “Getting Writers to Write” during Journalism Sequence Retreat, 2016
  • Serve as Interim Assistant Chair, Department of Media, Journalism and Film, 2013 to 2015
  • Serve on MJF Curriculum Committee, 2013
  • Serve as Print/Online Journalism Sequence Coordinator, 2012 to 2013
  • Serve as chair of departmental APT Committee, 2012 to 2013
  • Serve on departmental Executive Committee, 2012 to present
  • Participate on Technology, Washington Post Partnership and Grace Halsell Scholarship Committees, 2012
  • Provide academic and career advisement for students across sequences, 2012 to present
  • Organize ongoing series of guest lectures with prominent journalists, 2012 to present
  • Submit student entries for Hearst Awards, Society of Professional Journalists Mark of Excellence, AEJMC Magazine Competition and HBCU Newspaper Conference, 2012 to Present
  • Advise Howard University News Service, 2012 to present
  • Provide feedback and editing to students in other classes throughout the department
  • Supervised redesign, repositioning and relaunch of HUNewsService.com
  • Advise 101 Magazine, 2012 to present
  • Advise Cover to Cover, student magazine association, 2012 to present

 

School:

  • Edited journal for SOC’s 45th Anniversary, 2016
  • Served as co-chair of the SOC Reaccreditation Committee, 2014 to 2016
  • Served as chair of the MJF Reaccreditation Committee, 2014 to 2016
  • Serve on Budget Advisory Committee, 2013 to present
  • Assisted Committee of the Future Committee on merger of Department of Journalism and Department of Radio, Television and Film, October 2012 to 2013
  • Serve on Search Committee for proposed Department of Media, Journalism and Film, 2013
  • Coordinated school-wide coverage of presidential election, 2012 and 2016; and inauguration, 2013 and 2017; as well as RNC and DNC coverage in 2016.
  • Serve on school-wide Budget Committee, 2012 to present
  • Present sessions on critical thinking for Freshman Orientation classes, 2012 to present
  • Support and participate in national job fair and conference, 2012 to present

 

University:

  • Collaborated with World Languages and German Historical Institute on “Learning at the Margins” international conference, 2017
  • Collaborated with Spanish Department in interdisciplinary trip to Cuba, December 2016
  • Serve on Budget Advisory Committee, 2013 to present
  • Serve on The Hilltop Policy Board, 2015 to present
  • Worked with Departments of World Languages, English and Afro-American Studies to host pre-inaugural book signing and panel discussion on “The First Lady’s First Family,” featuring with Rachel Swarns, Howard graduate, N.Y. Times correspondent and author of “American Tapestry: The Black, White and Multicultural Ancestors of Michelle Obama,” January 2013
  • Assisted The Hilltop, which lacked an adviser, for the 2012-13 academic year
  • Participated in suicide prevention training
  • Reached out to students across disciplines at Howard and other universities for participation in 101 magazine and experience in all facets of publishing (i.e., legal, business, technology, distribution and international outreach)

 

  1. Public and Community Service

Community Service

  • Urban Health Media Project, part of team training high school students to cover health disparities in Washington and Baltimore in collaboration with Morgan State University under $300,000 W.K. Kellogg Foundation grant, 2016 to present
  • Back to School With The History Makers, presentation at E.L. Haynes Public Charter School, September 2016
  • The History Makers, Black History Month Keynote Speaker, Seaton Elementary School, February 2016
  • Moderator, HIV/AIDS panel and screening
  • Back to School With The History Makers, presentation with Cora Masters Berry at Ballou High School, September 2015
  • “Essays, Collected: How to Craft a Dynamic Anthology,” panelist, Baltimore Book Festival, September 2014
  • Black History Month keynote speaker for an audience of 600 at the University of Toledo; also gave sermon at the Historic Third Baptist Church and spoke at Scott High School and the Ella P. Stewart Academy, February 2014
  • National Advisory Council of the Center for Health Media and Policy at Hunter College, City University of New York; now George Washington University; assisting in revamping fellowship program (2012 to present)
  • G. James Gholson Middle School, Landover, Md., Career Day, 2013-Present

 

Professional Service

  • White House Correspondents Association, judge for journalism awards, 2017
  • National Magazine Awards, Judge, 2013 and 2017
  • Collaborated with Women in Film and Video on Women of Vision Award, honoring filmmaker Julie Dash; hosted WIFV board meeting, 2017
  • Working Group, Summit on Future of Journalism, National Press Club, 2017
  • Consulted on Rhoden Scholars program, co-sponsored by ESPN’s TheUndefeated.com and The New York Times; resulted in Hilltop editor Paul Holston, being selected for inaugural class, 2016 to present
  • Fact-Checking Summit, National Press Club, moderator, 2016
  • Fact-checking session at NABJ/NAHJ conference in Washington, panelist, 2016
  • National Advisory Council of the Center for Health Media and Policy at Hunter College, City University of New York; now at George Washington University, 2016 to present
  • Pittsburgh Black Media Federation, Robert L. Vann Media Awards Competition, newspaper features judge, 2015
  • “Local Media and Informed Participation,” Workshop of Industry and Experts, Democracy Fund and American Press Institute, 2015
  • New York Association of Black Journalists Board of Advisors, 2013 to present
  • Pittsburgh Black Media Federation, Robert L. Vann Media Awards Competition, newspaper features judge, 2014
  • National Association of Black Journalists, Salute to Excellence, judge, April 2013
  • National Newspaper Publishers Association, Awards Competition, Judge, 2012-2017
  • Association of Health Care Journalists, coordinated and moderated panels on emergency room and hospital room utilization, 2014, and infertility, 2013.
  • National Association of Black Journalists, coordinated two session on magazine publishing, 2013
  • New York Association of Black Journalisms Board of Advisors, 2013 to present
  • Editorial Board member, Journal of Magazine and New Media Research, 2012-Present
  • Wellness Warriors, a network of medical professionals and journalists committed to improving the physical, emotional and mental health of our communities; Co-Founder, 2012-Present

 

 

August 13, 2018                                                                             Yanick Rice Lamb                                            

____________________                                                          ________________________

Date                                                                                         Signature of Candidate

 

 

A digital portfolio is available for review at http://www.yanickricelamb.com/howard-portfolio/

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